Core Team

Prof
Stephanus
Muller

Director

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Dr
Hilde
Roos

General
Manager

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Dr
Paula
Fourie

Research
Fellow

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Prof
Willemien
Froneman

Associate
Professor

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Dr
Lizabé
Lambrechts

Postdoctoral
Researcher

Hidden
Years

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Prof
Christine
Lucia

Honorary
Professor

Moerane
Critical
Edition

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Pakama
Ncume


Sound
Archivist

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Dr
Marietjie
Pauw

Postdoctoral
Researcher

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Santie
de
Jongh

Special
Collections
Librarian

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Julia
Raynham

Project
Leader
e-Journal

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Dr
Marc
Rontsch

Postdoctoral
Researcher

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Dr
Stephanie
Vos

Postdoctoral
Researcher

IfPOP

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Stephanus Muller

Director

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Stephanus Muller holds masters degrees in musicology from the University of South Africa and Oxford University. In 2001 he was awarded a DPhil from Oxford University before returning to South Africa in the same year. Elected as the chairperson of the Musicological Society of Southern Africa in 2004, he was instrumental in merging this society with the Ethnomusicology Symposium in 2006. After his appointment as lecturer at Stellenbosch University in 2005, he created the Documentation Centre for Music (DOMUS) as a research and music heritage conservation initiative. Since then, DOMUS has acquired some of the most important and valuable archives of individuals and institutions pertaining to South African music, making it a unique repository of recorded music, scores and archival documents on the African continent. Since his appointment at Stellenbosch University, Muller has supervised groundbreaking studies by a new generation of South African music scholars, many of whom have gone on to study at prestigious universities abroad or occupy teaching positions at South African universities. He is currently Professor of Musicology at Stellenbosch University and Director of Africa Open – Institute for Music, Research and Innovation, an ambitious institutional project that responds to the challenges and opportunities of music studies in South Africa. He is also the Principal Investigator of the Andrew W. Mellon Delinking Encounters Project and the South African holder of the British Academy Newton Advanced Fellowship for the project South African Jazz Cultures and the Archive. In these capacities he manages, funds and supervises a range of important research initiatives. In 2015 he was awarded the prestigious Fowler-Hamilton Visiting Research Fellowship at Christ Church, University of Oxford. Muller has published widely locally and internationally and received Stellenbosch University’s Chancellor’s Award for Research in 2015. His most recent book, Nagmusiek, was awarded the Eugène Marais Prize by the Suid-Afrikaanse Akademie vir Wetenskap en Kuns, the Jan Rabie Rapport Prize, the kykNET-Rapport Prize and the University of Johannesburg Debut Prize for Creative Writing in Afrikaans.

Stephanus Muller

Director

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

  • 2014 Nagmusiek, Johannesburg: Fourthwall Books, ISBN 978-0-9922263-4-3.

  • 2013 Eoan – Our Story, eds. Hilde Roos and Wayne Muller, Eoan History Project, Johannesburg: Fourthwall Books, ISBN 978-0-9870429-1-0.

  • 2006 A Composer in Africa: Essays on the Life and Work of Stefans Grové, co-edited with Chris Walton, Stellenbosch: SUN Press, ISBN 1-920109-04-8.

  • 2005 Gender and Sexuality in South African Music, co-edited with Chris Walton, Stellenbosch: SUN Press, ISBN 1-919980-40-7.

  • 2012 ‘Betoog oor die epiese soektog na die beminde van die siel in die vernielde wingerd: ’n Begrafnispantomime vir jong Afrikaners in hul laat-dertigs, vroeë veertigs (na die voorbeeld van plaasteater in die styl van Gertruida Steyn)’, Jong Afrikaner, Fourthwall Books, Johannesburg ISBN 978-0-9869850-8-9.

  • 2010 Orientalizing Europe, Europeanizing Africa: The Fantastical Lives and Tales of Jan Gysbert Hugo (The Marquis) (Louis de) (Vere) Bosman di Ravelli, also known as Gian Bonzar, in (Auto)biography as a Musicological Discourse, eds. T. Markovic & V. Mikic. Belgrade: Department of Musicology, Faculty of Music, 142-159, ISBN 978-86-6051-027-5.

  • 2008 Die Stem, in: Van Volksmoeder tot Fokofpolisiekar, ed. Albert Grundlingh and Siegfried Huigen, SUN Press, 197-205.

  • 2008 Boeremusiek, in: Van Volksmoeder tot Fokofpolisiekar, ed. Albert Grundlingh and Siegfried Huigen, SUN Press, 189-196.

  • 2008 Arnold van Wyk’s Hands, in: Composing Apartheid, ed. Grant Olwage, Johannesburg: Wits University Press, 295-312.

  • 2006 Imagining Afrikaners Musically: Reflections on the African Music of Stefans Grové, in: A Composer in Africa: Essays on the Life and Work of Stefans Grové, 17-28.

  • 2006 Place, Identity and a Station Platform, in: A Composer in Africa: Essays on the Life and Work of Stefans Grové, 1-8.

  • 2006 Stefans Grové’s Narratives of Lateness, in: A Composer in Africa: Essays on the Life and Work of Stefans Grové, 49-62.

  • 2005 Imagining Afrikaners Musically: Reflections on the African Music of Stefans Grové, in: The World of South African Music: a Reader, selected, edited and introduced by Christine Lucia, London: Cambridge Scholar’s Press, 342-350.

  • 2005 Queer Alliances, in: Gender, Sexuality and Music in South Africa, 35-48.

  • 2016 Apartheid Aesthetics and Insignificant Art: The Songs of Stephanus le Roux Marais (1896-1979), The Journal of Musicology 33:1, 45-69.

  • 2011 Miniature Blueprints, Spider Strategems: a Michael Blake retrospective at 60, The Musical Times 152, Winter 2011, 71-92.

  • 2011 Twelve notes, twelve endnotes, Art South Africa 9:4, 40-44, ISSN 16846133.

  • 2009 Response to Chris Walton ‘Secret Agent Man?’, Musicus 37:2, 5-6, ISSN 0256-8837.

  • 2009 'n Blik op die resepsiegeskiedenis van Hendrik Hofmeyr se Sinfonia Africana, Musicus 37:1, 19-23, ISSN 0256-8837.

  • 2008 Gedagtes oor die korrespondensie tussen Anton Hartman en Arnold van Wyk, 1949-1981, Musicus 36:2, 45-49, ISSN 0256-8837.

  • 2008 Die Stem, De Gids, November-Desember, 976-989, ISSN 0016-9730, ISBN 978 90 50189354.

  • 2008 Arnold van Wyk’s hard, stony, flinty path, or making things beautiful in apartheid South Africa, The Musical Times, Winter 2008, 61-78.

  • 2008 Musiekgeskiedenis en fiksie: Hans Holleman en Arnold van Wyk in Holmer Johanssen se roman Gety, LitNet Akademies 5(1), Augustus 2008, ISSN 1995-5928.

  • 2005 Music Criticism and Adorno, The International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music 36:1, June 2005, 101-116, ISSN 0351-5796.

  • 2004 Response to David Hönigsberg ‘Chamber Symphony 1998’, Current Musicology 74, 2002, 259-263, ISSN 00113735.

  • 2001-2002 Contemporary South African Interfaces with Aspects of Adornian Musical Thought, Ars Nova 33/34, 30-35.

  • 2001 Spaces of Nationness: On Myth, Masks, Music and Afrikaner Identity, Tydskrif vir Nederlands en Afrikaans 8:1, 142-172, ISSN 1022-6966.

  • 2001 Exploring the Aesthetics of Reconciliation: Rugby and the South African National Anthem, South African Journal of Musicology 21, 19-37, ISSN 0258-509x.

  • 2001 Hubert du Plessis, South African Journal of Musicology 21, 60-62, ISSN 0258-509x.

  • 2000 Postmortem of biopsie? Oor middelpuntvliedende kragte, skynmodulasies, reënboë en Suid-Afrikaanse musikologie, Tydskrif vir Geesteswetenskappe 40:3, 232-239.

  • 2000 Imagining Afrikaners Musically: Reflections on the ‘African Music’ of Stefans Grové, Literator 21:3, 123-138, ISSN 0258-2279.

  • 1999-2000 Protesting Relevance: John Joubert and the Politics of Music, South African Journal of Musicology 19/20, 33-46, ISSN 0258-509x.

Stephanus Muller

Director

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

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Dr Hilde Roos

General Manager

Hilde Roos is the General Manager of Africa Open Institute for Music, Research and Innovation at Stellenbosch University. Her research interests concern the archive, historical representations of the practice of Western art music and the concomitant (colonial) mutations thereof in South Africa.

Dr Hilde Roos

General Manager

  • 2018 The La Traviata Affair – opera in the time of apartheid. University of California Press. To be published in October.

  • 2013 Eoan – our Story: an oral history of the Eoan Group (co-editor). Fourthwall Books, ISBN 978-0-9870429-1-0.

  • 2016 ‘Briewe aan ’n diva: die verswyging van gay-identiteit in Gordon Jephtas se briewe aan May Abrahamse’, (Letters to a diva: the concealment of gay identity in the letters of Gordon Jephtas to May Abrahamse), Litnet Akademies Vol 13/1, pp. 31-55, ISSN 1995-5928.

  • 2015 ‘Eoan – Our Story: Treading new methodological paths in music historiography’, Historia, Vol 60/2, pp. 185-200. ISSN 0018-229X.

  • 2014 ‘Probing the boundaries of opera as notated practice in South Africa: the case of Eoan’, Muziki, Vol 11/2, pp. 79-88, ISSN 1812-5980.

  • 2014 ‘Viva Verdi: Ringing the changes at Cape Town Opera’. Acta Musicologica, Vol 86/2, pp. 249-266, ISSN 0001-6241.

  • 2013 ‘Remembering to forget the Eoan Group ¬– the legacy of an opera company from the apartheid era’, South African Theatre Journal, Vol 27/1, pp. 1-18, ISSN 2163-7660.

  • 2012 ‘Indigenization and History: how opera in South Africa became South African opera’, Acta Academica, Supplement 2012/1, pp. 117-155, ISSN 0587-2405.

Dr Hilde Roos

General Manager

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Paula Fourie

Research Fellow

Paula Fourie is a writer living in Stellenbosch, South Africa. She currently works as research fellow at Africa Open: Institute for Music, Research and Innovation at Stellenbosch University where she is completing a monograph based on her doctoral research, a biography of South African musician and musical theatre composer Taliep Petersen. Using biography as a means to explore the reciprocal relationship between an artist’s life and work, Paula’s work is specifically concerned with the creation of life stories through the performance of memory, on the one hand, and the curation of the self in personal archives, on the other. It is perhaps unsurprising that these convergent interests have led to a commitment to explore the boundaries between historical writing and fiction.

 

Paula is also active in professional theatre, having worked alongside her husband, South African playwright Athol Fugard, since 2012. Production credits include Master Harold … and the boys (Signature Theatre, New York, 2016, associate director), The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek (Fugard Theatre, Cape Town, 2016, co-director), and The Shadow of the Hummingbird (Fugard Theatre, Cape Town, 2014, co-director). Recently her practical work in theatre has met with her work as a researcher, resulting in a secondary research project concerned with exploring the role of music in the Fugard’s oeuvre.

 

Paula holds BMus and MMus degrees from the University of Pretoria. While working towards the latter during 2009 and 2010, she was employed at the Drakensberg Boys Choir School in Kwazulu-Natal as choral conductor, arts and culture teacher and head of the New Boys Training Programme. Since receiving her PhD from Stellenbosch University in 2013, she has travelled abroad extensively, whether serving her involvement in theatre, or to present her academic research at conferences in Europe, the USA or South America. Paula’s published work includes academic journal articles, essays, book reviews, interviews, plays, poetry, and photo-essays. Her work on Taliep Petersen’s biography has been supported by an African Humanities Program Postdoctoral Fellowship hosted by the American Council of Learned Societies (2015) and a grant from the Academic and Non-Fiction Author’s Association of South Africa (2016).

Paula Fourie

Research Fellow

  • “Memory on the Stage: Performativity in David Kramer and Taliep Petersen's Kat and the Kings”, LitNet Akademies, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 75-112.

  • “Review Article: Musical Echoes – South African Women Thinking in Jazz”, South African Music Studies, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 105-116.

  • “Wagnerian Embodiments in Etienne Leroux’s 18-44”, LitNet Akademies, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 446-478.

  • Forthcoming “Afterword,” The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek, accepted for publication by Theatre Communications Group, New York.

  • “The Cape Coon Carnival as Seen Through the Lens of an Outsider, or to Be More Precise, of a White Afrikaans Musicologist Who Used to Study the Markuspassion of Johann Sebastian Bach”, Society for Ethnomusicology Student News, vol. 12, no. 2, Fall/Winter 2016, pp. 31-37.

  • 2018 “Taliep Petersen: An interview with Paul Hanmer”, South African Music Studies, vol. 36/37, 416-448.

  • 2015 “Gys de Villiers: ‘'n Afrikaner Alien of Extraordinary Ability…’”, LitNet, 9 June.

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  • 2015 “Athol Fugard en Pieter-Dirk Uys Gesels met Paula Fourie”, LitNet, 7 May.

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  • 2012 “Ten Fingers to Count the Stars”, Art South Africa, issue 11.1, pp. 70-74.

  • 2010/2011 “Sonic Spaces of the Karoo: The Sacred Music of a South African Coloured Community, Marie Jorritsma: Book Review”, South African Music Studies, vol. 30/31, pp. 187-190.

  • 2010/2011 “The International Association for the Study of Popular Music 16th Biennial International Conference: Report”, South African music studies, vol. 30/31, pp. 195-198.

  • 2015 “Prelude”, in A Fugard, The Shadow of the Hummingbird, Human & Rousseau, Cape Town, pp. 19-32.

  • 2014 “Prelude”, in A Fugard, The Shadow of the Hummingbird, Theatre Communications Group, New York, pp. 5-18.

  • 2013 “God se Rioolstelsel”, New Contrast, vol. 41, no. 3, South African Literary Journal, p. 36.

  • 2013 “Jy Vra oor Jou Geboorte”, New Contrast, vol. 41, no. 3, South African Literary Journal, p. 37

  • 2012 “Om Mani Padme Hum”, Carapace Poetry Journal, vol. 92, Snailpress, Cape Town, p. 15.

Paula Fourie

Research Fellow

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Prof Willemien Froneman

Associate Professor

Willemien Froneman is an extraordinary associate professor at AOI. She writes about white musical aesthetics in South Africa, mainly through the lens of boeremusiek—a marginal and much-stigmatized genre of South African folk music. She coedits the journal SAMUS: South African Music Studies.

Prof Willemien Froneman

Associate Professor

  • ‘After Fame: A Micro-Ethnography of Popular Late Style’, Popular Music & Society. Published online first.

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  • ‘Ex-Centric Hermeneutics in Stephanus Muller’s Nagmusiek’, Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle. Published online.

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  • ‘Music and Landscape: Two Tales of Borehole Drilling in the Karoo’, Cultural Geographies, Vol. 22/4 (2015), 713-722.

  • ‘Subjunctive Pleasure: The Odd Hour in the Boeremusiek Museum’, Popular Music, Vol. 33/1 (2014), 1-17.

  • ‘Seks, ras en boeremusiek: agter die retoriek van gebrekkige sanglus by die 1938-Voortrekkereeufees’, LitNet Akademies, Vol. 11/2 (2014).

  • ‘She Danced Alone: Jo Fourie, Songcatcher of the Groot Marico’, Ethnomusicology Forum, Vol. 21/1 (2012), 53-76.

  • The Riches of Embarrassment [On doing ethnography at home], Critical Arts, Vol. 25/2 (2011), 309-315.

  • ”Composing According to Silence”: Undecidability in Derrida and Cage’s Roaratorio’, International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music, Vol. 41/2 (2010), 293-317.

Prof Willemien Froneman

Associate Professor

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Dr Lizabé Lambrechts

Postdoctoral Researcher

Project manager Hidden Years

Dr Lizabé Lambrechts
Volkswagen Stiftung Research Fellow and Project Leader of the Hidden Years music archive (Hidden Years).
Lizabé Lambrechts is a Volkswagen Stiftung Research Fellow, partnered between Africa Open, Institute for Music, Research and Innovation (Stellenbosch University), the School for Oriental and African Studies (University of London), and the British Library and Archive. She completed her PhD in 2012 on five South African music archives as sites where embedded notions of power and politics become visible. After being appointed as the project leader of the Hidden Years music archive project she obtained training as an audio-visual archivist at ICCROM, an affiliate of UNESCO. She serves as the Vice Chair of the South African Society for Research in Music (SASRIM).
Her Ph.D. research was focused on investigating five music archives in South Africa as sites where embedded notions of power and politics become visible. This work was an attempt to situate music archives within the recent critical discourse on archives and processes of archive making, a discourse wherein the music archive was mostly absent. Employing self-reflexive ethnographic methodologies combined with a rigorous theoretical framework, allowed for a wide range of theoretical explorations about notions of politics, community, crises, storytelling, apparatus of capture, loss and being lost in the archive. In addition, this work incorporated a critical interrogation of archival methodologies such as the creation of inventories, catalogues, classifications, chronologies, descriptions, numbering systems and finding aids to explore the mechanisms of the archive that serve to institute and maintain power. This study revealed that archival processes, individuals, institutional spaces and contexts, function within an intricate web that is continually working towards creating the archive.
During her post-doctoral work, she has published and worked with a variety of media and contexts in order to explore notions of archive, its impact on the present and our understanding of the constructions of history. Some of these projects include the collaborative exhibition project “Lingering absences: Hearing landscape through memory” (2013), a collaborative sound installation “As you are standing here” (2016), and a performance piece, “Archive in Process” (2016), wherein the daily life and routine of an archivist was performed in front of a window where passers-by could view and interact with the various processes that determine archival collections.
Through pursuing interdisciplinary work spanning music and culture studies, history, curatorship and archival science, her work locates its civic responsibility both in terms of the past and the present. Whereas her work is historically concerned with re-inscribing marginalized voices into the historical record, it is also aware that institutional and personal archives harbor the potential to reinvent and to look at things anew.

Dr Lizabé Lambrechts

Postdoctoral Researcher

Project manager Hidden Years

  • Lambrechts, L. & E. Van der Wal. 2018. Landscapes of Loss: Curatorial Mapping and the Use of Archival Sound Recordings. Forthcoming, SAMUS 37

  • Lambrechts, L. 2016. Performing the Aporias of the Archive: Towards a Future for South African Music Archives. Historia 61(1): 132-154.

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  • Lambrechts, L. 2016. An Encounter with the archive: dealing with the challenges of representing a history. Conference proceedings from the 19th Annual History Seminar, ‘Ernesto Restrepo Tirado’, entitled “Ojos abiertos, oídos despiertos:” Patrimonio audiovisual como fuente de análisis histórico (Sound and image as historical sources), 15-17 October 2015, National Museum of Colombia, Bogota. ISSN 2422-4677.

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  • Lambrechts, L. 2015. The house where history ended up: Packing up the Ben Segal Collection. Fontes Artis Musicae, Special Topics issue on Archives as Evidence 62(3): 166-182.

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  • Lambrechts, L. & S. Vos. Record | Memory | Archive. International workshop, public talk and concert series, 5-7 September, Stellenbosch.

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  • Lambrechts, L. 2016. Archive in Process: Unpacking the Hidden Years Music Archive. Performance Piece, 1-9 November 2016, Stellenbosch University.

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  • Van der Wal, E. & L. Lambrechts. 2015-2016. As you are standing here. In collaboration with Allen Price (Ohio State University, Columbus), students and curators a mapping installation was created using recorded audio contributed through a mobile web application. It was exhibited as part of the Stellenbosch 360 outdoor art installations (July 2016-January 2017).

Dr Lizabé Lambrechts

Postdoctoral Researcher

Project manager Hidden Years

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Christine Lucia

Honorary Professor

Prject Manager Moerane Critical Edition

Born in London, Christine Lucia immigrated to South Africa in 1974 and from the late 1970s to early 1990s taught music at Diocesan School for Girls, Rhodes University, Natal University, and the University of Durban-Westville (UDW). She was active as a concert pianist throughout this period, an SABC recording artist, and concerto soloist with the Kwa-Zulu Natal Philharmonic Orchestra. She was Head of Music at UDW 1989-95, Rhodes 1997-2002 and Wits 2002-3, managing change in degree programmes and curricula. Aside from academic publications, she has published four short stories and is a member of the London Writers’ Café. Christine Lucia received an NRF grant in 2006-7 for a ‘Theorizing the Global South’ project at Wits, was Overseas Visiting Scholar at St. John’s College Cambridge in 2001-2002, and academic resident at the Bellagio Rockefeller Center in April 2009. In 2004-2008, Lucia edited the journal SAMUS: South African Music Studies (formerly the South African Journal of Musicology: SAMUS). She was Extraordinary Professor in the Music Dept. at Stellenbosch University from 2009 to 2014, and has been Honorary Professor at Africa Open Institute since 2016. She has published two books: The World of South African Music: A Reader (2005) and Music Notation: A South African Guide (2011) as well as numerous articles and book chapters. She established the website www.african-composers-edition.co.za in 2012 for the publication of South African music, which now houses the Joshua Pulumo Mohapeloa Critical Edition in Six Volumes, revised 2016 for CD-ROM (published 2018), and the Surendran Reddy Performing Edition, still in progress. She also produced the CD African Choral Heritage: Recordings of Joshua Pulumo Mohapeloa in 2013. Christine Lucia won a National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences award in 2018 for ‘Best Digital Humanities Project for Community Engagement’. Over the past twenty years she has mentored, supervised, or examined many postgraduate students in South Africa and abroad and still acts as a reviewer for national and international journals and publishers.

Christine Lucia

Honorary Professor

Prject Manager Moerane Critical Edition

  • 2017. ‘“Yet None With Truer Fervour Sing”: Coronation Song and the (De)Colonization of African Choral Composition.’ African Music: Journal of the International Library of African Music 10(3), 23-44.

  • 2016. Joshua Pulumo Mohapeloa Critical Edition in Six Volumes, revised edition. Cape Town: South African Society for Research in Music. [CD-ROM, published 2018]

  • 2015. Joshua Pulumo Mohapeloa Critical Edition in Six Volumes. Cape Town: African Composers Edition. [CD-ROM]

  • 2014. ‘Composing Towards/Against Whiteness: The African Music of Mohapeloa.’ In Unsettling Whiteness, ed. Samantha Schulz and Lucy Michaels, 219-230. Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press [e-Book]

  • 2013. ‘Kevin Volans.’ In Komponisten der Gegenwart: Edition Text + Kritik 50, ed. Hanns-Werner Heister and Walter-Wolfgang Sparrer, 1-16, A-N, I-XIV [multi-section entry for a music lexicon]. Munich: Richard Boorberg Verlag.

  • 2013. African Choral Legacy: Historic Recordings of Joshua Pulumo Mohapeloa. Stellenbosch: African Composers Edition, CD ACE001.

  • 2012 (with Michael Blake). ‘Don Maclennan and Music.’ In No Other World: Essays on the Life-Work of Don Maclennan, ed. Dan Wylie and Craig MacKenzie, 124-147. Cape Town: Print Matters.

  • 2011. Music Notation: A South African Guide. Pretoria: Unisa Press.

  • 2011. ‘Die Sprache des Bilds im Klang: Zur Bedeutung der bildenden Kunst im Schaffen von Kevin Volans.’ Musiktexte 129 (May), 45-50.

  • 2011. ‘Mohapeloa and the Heritage of African Song.’ African Music: Journal of the International Library of African Music 9(1), 56-86.

  • 2009. ‘Celebrating Composer Kevin Charles Volans, b.1949.’ Musicus 37(1), 3-18.

  • 2009. ‘“The Landscape Within”: The String Quartets of Kevin Volans.’ SAMUS: South African Music Studies 29, 1-30

  • 2008. ‘Back to the Future? Idioms of ‘Displaced Time’ in South African Composition’. In Composing Apartheid: Essays of the Music of Apartheid, ed. Grant Olwage, 11-34. Johannesburg: Wits University Press.

  • 2007. ‘How Critical is Music Theory.’ Critical Arts 21(1), 166-89.

  • 2007. ‘Travesty or Prophecy? Views of South African Black Choral Composition’. In Music and Identity: Transformation & Negotiation, ed. Eric Akrofi, Maria Smit & Stig-Magnus Thorsén, 161-80. Stellenbosch: SUN Press.

  • 2005. The World of South African Music: A Reader, introduced, compiled and edited by C. Lucia. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Press.

  • 2005. ‘Abdullah Ibrahim and “African Pianism” in South Africa’. In Towards an African Pianism: Keyboard Music of Africa and the Diaspora, Vol. 1, eds. Cynthia Tse Kimberlin and Akin Euba, 53-67. California: MRI Press.

  • 2005. ‘Mapping the Field: A Preliminary Survey of South African Composition and Performance as Research.’ SAMUS: South African Journal of Musicology 25, 101-3

Christine Lucia

Honorary Professor

Prject Manager Moerane Critical Edition

  • African Composers Edition A small sheet music publisher specializing in African compositions

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  • Christine Lucia

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Pakama Ncume

Sound Archivist

Faculty Arts and Social Science

Pakama Ncume works as a Sound Archivist at Africa Open Institute for Music, Research and Innovation, Stellenbosch University.

After completing her B.A (Music Education) degree at the then University of Transkei, she enrolled for Postgraduate Diploma in Library and Information Science (PGDIPLIS) at the University of Cape Town. On completion of the diploma, she moved back to the Eastern Cape. Because the area had few libraries, jobs in this field were scarce. With the advantage of having two professions (educator and librarian), she then took a teaching post at Nozuko Senior Secondary School in Mthatha. It was during her time as an educator that Pakama decided to further her studies and enrolled with the University of Transkei for an honours degree in Library and Information Science, a degree she completed in 2004.

She later joined an NGO, Room to Read South Africa in Pretoria as a Programme Manager for the Reading Room Programme. Her main responsibility was facilitating implementation of school libraries and conducting teacher trainings on library management in various regions of Mpumalanga and Eastern Cape. Because the schools had no librarians, teachers had to be librarians too. With all the teaching responsibilities, it was not easy for them to also read all the librarianship books available. It was because of this gap that Pakama started to write simplified step by step guides and manuals for school teacher librarians on library management, library activities and library sustainability for two NGO’s (Room to Read and African Solutions to African Problems)

Having gained experience in community developmnet work, Pakama joined a social facilitation company Masimanyane Community Developers as a Social Facilitator. In 2013, Pakama started working at Walter Sisulu University where she was appointed as a Music Librarian and Sound Archivist. Pakama was responsible for starting and setting up the sound archive that comprised mainly of LP’s that the university had received as a donation from SABC (sound recordings that were used on air by former Radio Transkei and Capital Radio). She was also responsible for digitizing the sound recordings. In 2017, she joined AOI also for the same role of a Sound Archivist, mainly responsible for digitizing a wide collection of sound records including reel to reel tapes, LP’s, tape cassettes etc.

Pakama Ncume

Sound Archivist

Faculty Arts and Social Science

Pakama Ncume

Sound Archivist

Faculty Arts and Social Science

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Marietjie Pauw

Postdoctoral Researcher

Arts and Social Sciences

Marietjie Pauw is an Andrew W. Mellon-funded postdoctoral researcher with Africa Open – Institute for Music, Research and Innovation at Stellenbosch University. Her research focuses on aspects of curating music in local contexts and on exploring alternative publishing formats. Her current music curations are inspired by the investigation of interventionist approaches that contemporary curating, artistic research and decolonial aestheSis bring when brought into orbit with classical (and broader than classical) sound installations.

Marietjie completed the degrees BMus, BMus(Hons) and MMus at Stellenbosch University, and received the Unisa Teaching Licentiate in Music and the Unisa Performance Licentiate in Music (with flute as instrument) from the University of South Africa in 1991. Her PhD research in artistic research culminated in a dissertation entitled ‘Curating South African flute compositions: Landscape as theme of exhibition’ in 2015 (Stellenbosch University). She has published articles in Acta Academica, LitNet Akademies, Journal of the Musical Arts in Africa, South African Music Studies and in NewMusicSA Bulletin and she has presented papers and performances at national and international conferences. As flutist she has played with chamber musicians, poets and artists that have premièred South African compositions, and performed on national festivals such as the National Arts Festival (Grahamstown, 2006), the Klein Karoo Nasionale Kunstefees (Oudtshoorn, 2007), Klein Karoo Klassique (Oudtshoorn, 2012) and the Woordfees (Stellenbosch 2005, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2016, 2018). She recorded solos on the Afrimusik label and the southernbuzz label, the latter in 2012 as a flute duo CD with Barbara Highton Williams, entitled Fofa le nna. The short films Kreun (Aryan Kaganof, 2016) and Khoisan ghost kreun (Aryan Kaganof, 2016) portray Marietjie and Garth Erasmus in their music intervention in response to the history of forced removals from Roesdorp in Stellenbosch. Marietjie and Garth, with Francois Blom, presented Khoi’npsalms as investigative, curated music production, and the artistic response in the format of film that resulted from this production is entitled Nege fragmente uit ses khoi’npsalms (Aryan Kaganof, 2018). Marietjie Pauw teaches flute at the Johnman Music Centre in Stellenbosch.

 

Marietjie Pauw

Postdoctoral Researcher

Arts and Social Sciences

  • Pauw, E.M. (Marietjie). “The Flute Becomes a Gun: A Flautist’s Perspectives on Aryan Kaganof’s Film ‘Night Is Coming: A Threnody for the Victims of Marikana.’” SAMUS: South African Music Studies 34/35 (2014/2015): 408-25.

  • Pauw, E.M. (Marietjie). “Musicking Poulenc’s ruins in Stellenbosch” Acta Academica 49:2 (2017) 68-94.

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  • Pauw, E.M. (Marietjie). “An African Festivity for Flute: Sensing diversity, creolisation and knowledge through sound.” (2017)

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  • Pauw,E.M. (Marietjie). “Reverberations of Poerpasledam for flute and piano by Arnold van Wyk” (2014)

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Marietjie Pauw

Postdoctoral Researcher

Arts and Social Sciences

  • Conceptual and geo-political curating

    ‘Mapping music and musicking’ was the title of one of my recent research focus areas. The data gathered pointed to a local musicking scenario in which music is largely perceived as entertainment (for the listener), as skill (for the musician), as an income generator (for the musician and for the administrator working in the so-called creative and cultural industries) and as a means to further education (for the learner and teacher). The capacity that music has to also do critical work in geo-political conceptual scenarios, through interventionist contemporary curation and interpretation, appears to be a less prevalent consideration within the musicking scenarios of entertainment/ skill/ income/ education. In response to this latter observation, I am particularly interested in the roles of the performing-musician-as-curator, and the taking responsibility of the musician’s activist intervention as curator, rather than the roles of the musician as caretaker-curator. In these interests I have found decolonial aestheSis to be formative to my practice and praxis. My research investigates and applies ways in which the musician-player is able to curate music and sound towards critical scenarios both inside and outside conventional art spaces. These curations are produced within tensions of artistic research, where the aim is to find knowledges that lie in the mutual coupling of theory to practice and practice to theory. The knowledges thus gained are informed by reflection on curations, and are communicated in conventional publication, but also in newer formats of publication.

    The following projects that date from late 2015 to the present are examples of geo-political curations and music events and research that I have engaged in or that I have initiated.

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Santie de Jongh

Santie de Jongh is the Special Collections Librarian at the Music Library and is responsible for the day to day running of the Music Special Collections, which include DOMUS. Her duties include the archival processing (ordering and conservation) of materials and postgraduate research support. She is actively involved in facilitating research on DOMUS collections, which includes advising music researchers on archival processing and preservation. Based on her archival work, her MMus degree (Stellenbosch University 2008) entailed the design and construction of a comprehensive national directory of music archives and special collections, which included visits to a number of archival repositories in South Africa. She is the South African Corresponding Editor for Fontes Artis Musicae and Chair of the continental steering committee of RILM.

Santie de Jongh

Santie de Jongh

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Julia Raynham

Project leader e-journal

Julia Raynham is an artist functioning in multiple professions. Her working world is configured through her inter-disciplinary creative research and practice, which resonates with forward thinking social movements, decolonial aesthesis and african knowledge production.

She has a deep commitment to doing, sensing, thinking and believing in the power and purpose of the imagination, to produce works of art and reservoirs of knowledge which support cultural, historical and political restitution in South Africa.

Her work integrates socially engaged performance art, composition, cultural research & writing, originating cultural projects-productions, art & music pedagogy and working with African divinatory healing practices. It has the capacity to undermine orthodoxy and define rhythms of production and cooperative practices, which present a step forward in the democratization of knowledge.

She is the Artistic Director of Resonance Bazar, a non-profit company which she founded in 2005, which is currently developing a Residency Programme for visiting artists-scholars-researchers in Woodstock Cape Town, called the ‘Radio Garden Residency’.

Her part-time work with AOI, focuses on the establishment of the Institute’s Electronic Journal and Fellowship Programme.

Julia Raynham

Project leader e-journal

Julia Raynham

Project leader e-journal

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Dr Marc Rontsch

Postdoctoral Researcher

Africa Open Institute

Marc holds a PhD in Musicology from Stellenbosch University, and currently works as an Andrew W. Mellon Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at Africa Open: Institute for Music, Research and Innovation.

Marc currently is working on two research projects. He is part of the Michael Moerane Critical Edition research team run by Prof Christine Lucia. Marc’s involvement in this project is to create a critical edition of Moerane’s orchestral work Fatse le Heso (‘My Country’) as well as to engage with debates and positions within the field of the Digital Humanities and Digital Scholarly Editions.

Marc is also working on converting his doctoral dissertation into a book. This research focuses on the life of Zimbabwean-born composer Christopher Langford James, whose archive is held in DOMUS. This project extends from his doctoral research, and engages with a dialogical relationship between life history and musical output, and is located and positioned within archival theory at Africa Open: Institute for Music, Research and Innovation. He performs and records with Cape Town Progressive Grunge band Black Moscow, and has appeared as a soloist with The University of Stellenbosch Symphony Orchestra, premiering Hans Roosenschoon’s “…or to err…” in 2013. As of 2017, Marc is also the bassist for the Stellenbosch University Jazz Band. Marc’s other interests include tea, reading and Doctor Who. He is also happily engaged to saxophonist and arranger Claire de Kock.

 

Dr Marc Rontsch

Postdoctoral Researcher

Africa Open Institute

Dr Marc Rontsch

Postdoctoral Researcher

Africa Open Institute

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Stephanie Vos

Postdoctoral Researcher

Project Manager IfPOP

Stephanie is the project leader of the Interdisciplinary Forum for Popular Music (ifPOP) at Africa Open. She comes to this project from a research perspective that crosses disciplinary boundaries (exile and displacement), and a music practice (South African jazz) that exceeds narrow understandings of genre, and which exists in tension with notions of “the popular”. Stephanie’s doctoral research, undertaken at Royal Holloway, University of London, was an inquiry into discourses of South African exile in the 1960s through the lens of jazz. Abdullah Ibrahim’s music of the 1960s was a focal point in this research project.

Stephanie has taught at Unisa, and tutored at Stellenbosch University and Royal Holloway. She has presented her research at various conferences in the USA, UK, Europe and South Africa, and is currently the Secretary of the South African Society for Research in Music. Stephanie regularly experiments with the interface between the academic and public spheres. To this effect, she has curated film screenings in the UK, and organised two symposia on Music and Exile in partnership with Goethe Institute (Johannesburg).

ifPOP is the realization of an interdisciplinary research and artistic platform upon which Stephanie would like to see her (future) work.

Stephanie Vos

Postdoctoral Researcher

Project Manager IfPOP

  • 2017 Stephanie Vos. (2017). Book review: Marabi Nights: Jazz, ‘Race’, and Society in Early Apartheid South Africa SAMUS, Vol. 36/37.

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  • Stephanie Vos and Stephanus Muller (eds.). (forthcoming). Korrespondensie tussen Anton Hartman en Arnold van Wyk, 1949-1981. Annotated letters, co-edited with Stephanus Muller, Protea Publishers.

  • Stephanie Vos. (forthcoming) ‘The Exhibition of Vandalizim: Improvising Politics, Film and Healing in South Africa’. Book chapter in Playing for Keeps: Improvisation in the Aftermath of Crisis, ed. Eric Porter and Daniel Fishlin, Duke University Press

Stephanie Vos

Postdoctoral Researcher

Project Manager IfPOP

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