Masters Fellows

Pakama
Ncume

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Anke
Froehlich

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Zayne
Upton

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Marco
Nachenius

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Pakama Ncume

BIOGRAPHY

Pakama Ncume works as a Sound Archivist at Africa Open Institute for Music, Research and Innovation, Stellenbosch University. She joined the institute in 2017.  When she applied for this position, her intention was not only to work but also to pursue her studies there. In 2018, she registered for a bridging course with the History department, a requirement for her to do Masters in History that she is pursuing. Her research interest is on the music that was performed in the Market Theatre Café from 1976 to 1980. The study is a result of her work on the Hidden Years music archive (Hidden Years), an archive collected by David Marks that documents alternative popular music in South Africa from 1957-2005.

 

Working on the archive, Pakama was fascinated by rich history that the archive contains, a history that little has been written about, mainly due to the inaccessibility of the material that was held in private ownership until 2013. Both her work as a sound archivist and the research she is undertaking form part of a bigger project that aims to open up this archive.

RESEARCH
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Anke Froehlich

BIOGRAPHY

Anke Froehlich is a music graduate from the University of Stellenbosch where she spent her final year studying South African music copyright under the guidance of Dr Carina Venter. She will continue to explore this topic under the supervision of Dr Lizabé Lambrechts as Masters fellow and archival intern at HYMAP.

RESEARCH

My thesis investigates three music archives as sites where copyright is employed as a protective measure, yet it unwittingly compromises the accessibility of the material. Unlike the public domain, these archives are imagined as dynamic repositories of commercial, cultural objects that are stored with the intention of advancing further knowledge production. Central to this investigation lies the difficulty of hosting music archives at colonial universities where funding for maintaining heritage projects is not easily obtained. This work attempts to situate copyright as a productive tool within the recent discourse on modern, decolonial universities.

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Zayne Upton

BIOGRAPHY

As far back as I can remember I have had a passion for music and technology. I recall teaching myself how to program Basic and use it to make my computer reproduce a piece I was learning on the piano. This was my first exploration into representing music in a way a computer could understand: as a series of numbers indicating pitch and duration. I continued to explore music and computing, using the Apple Macintosh II in the University of Durban-Westville’s recording studio to study computer-based music. When I went to Pretoria University to finish my BMus, I explored areas such as notation software, helping students notate examples for their theses. I then moved into technology full-time and have been working in software development professionally ever since, helping companies and individuals solve problems using technology. To keep the creativity flowing, I have developed a home music studio where I create music using a computer, a MIDI keyboard, and various software programs.

RESEARCH

My aim is to prepare documentation describing how the existing website www.african-composers-edition.co.za could be scaled up into a digital platform for the publication and scholarly study of the more neglected music of South Africa, beginning with the music of M.M. Moerane. The objective is to design and build the system this upscaling requires within the new field of South African critical editions, for the display of music scores, recordings, and documents. In the first instance these will relate to the Andrew Mellon Moerane Critical Edition, but in the second they can support any number of future digital editions. A secondary objective is to document the entire process of building the new platform so that this new digital field in Africa can be more easily understood and expanded in future, and so that new opportunities for digital musicology in South Africa can be opened up.

?         The research for, and development of this platform and these new opportunities is motivated by the following concerns:

?         Lack of access to black South African music repertoires both nationally and internationally;

?         Lack of access to information about African choral music;

?         Lack of visibility of some southern African composers and musics, especially notated choral music;

?         Limited professionalization in the choral music industry due to an absence of critically authenticated scores and recordings and well-researched information;

?         Vanishing repertoires and documentation associated with them;

?         Inadequate knowledge about royalty collection and the legal uses of music.

In order to address these concerns, my research aims to explore, identify, develop and extend the vocabulary for, and begins to address practical problems relating to, a new application of digital technology in the field of South African musicology, thereby expanding existing concepts in the digital humanities into the musicological sphere and opening up greater possibilities for transdisiplinarity.

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BIOGRAPHY

I am a composition master’s student at AOI. I am studying under the guidance of Marc Röntsch, Stephanus Muller and Reza Khota. I attained my degree in composition in the Stellenbosch Konservatorium in 2017.

RESEARCH

The primary focus of my research is the expansion of the Heavy Metal genre. This includes a resulting composition exploiting these ideas of expansion in performance spaces for western art music and popular music

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