Doctoral Fellows

 

Felicia
Lesch

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Inge
Engelbrecht

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Danell
Müller

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Santie
de
Jongh

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Angie
Mullins

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Annemie
Behr

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Pierre-Henri
Wicomb

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Minette
du
Toit-Pearce

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Wayne
Muller

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Mokale
Koapeng

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Visser
Liebenberg

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Saskia
Nicole
Smith

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Erika
Jacobs

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Nicola
Deane

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Grace
O
Talabi

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Boitumelo
Tlhoaele

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Felicia Lesch

BIOGRAPHY

Felicia Lesch holds a BMus (Ed) degree from the University of Cape Town and a MMus from Stellenbosch University (SU). The title of her thesis for her MMus was: The Certificate Programme in Music: A Means of Broadening Access to Higher Music Education Studies at The University of Stellenbosch. This research underpins her daily work at the music department at Stellenbosch University, where she heads the Unit for Community Music (UCM).

RESEARCH

Felicia is also passionate about jazz education, and some of her highlights include being selected to conduct the National Schools Big Band at the Standard Bank National Youth jazz festival in Grahamstown in 2009. She directs the University of Stellenbosch Jazz Band (USJB), who were the category and overall winners of the National Ensemble competition in 2012. This band was part of a production which won the award for best performance in the open-air category of the Kyknet Fiestas in 2018.

The band’s highlights include performances at Woordfees, Oude Libertas Summer Concert Series, and the Cape Town Jazz Band Festival at the Baxter, as well as benefit concerts for community partners in Steenberg, Mitchells Plain and Athlone. Prominent soloists who have appeared with this band include performances with Sibongile Khumalo, Amanda Strydom, Corlea Botha, Judith Sephuma, Gloria Bosman and Timothy Moloi.

In 2011, she was part of a committee who were responsible for the creation and implementation of the Higher Certificate in Music and the Diploma in Practical Music at the music department at SU. Other highlights of her career at SU include the Rector’s Award for Excellence (2010 and 2014), appearing as a speaker at the Social Impact conference at SU in 2017, and at the SU Library Week, speaking about how her work impacted her research for the Masters’ degree.  Felicia has presented papers at Sasrim conferences in 2015 and 2016. She is a member of the board of Directors of the Cape Philharmonic Orchestra and has served as an adjudicator for various Eisteddfodau and cultural festivals. These  include the Unisa Gr 8 scholarship competition (2009), the Tygerberg and Afrikaans Eisteddfods (2011; 2013; 2014, 2016), the Cape Malay Choir Competition, the Samro Overseas Scholarship Competition (2012; 2013), and the Hubert van der Spuy Competition (2012). As a recent member of the Fiësta panel, she adjudicates festivals such as KKNK, Aardklop, and Innibos, amongst others.

 

She is passionate about music as a vehicle for social change and remains deeply committed to those ideals.

 

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Inge Engelbrecht

BIOGRAPHY

Inge Engelbrecht is a part-time lecturer at the Music Department at Stellenbosch University. She obtained her BMus and HonsBMus (music education) degrees at SU and now lectures in the bridging Certificate in Music Programme. She completed her master’s degree (cum laude) in March 2017. Her master’s research focused on documenting the life and works of three composers who have strong ties to Genadendal, the first mission station in South Africa.

RESEARCH

“To acknowledge the sound of coloured people’s voices raised in song [is] an integral part of the very diverse and varied entity known collectively as ‘South African music’”. (Jorritsma, 2011).

The Afrikaans koortjie (little chorus) can be viewed as a vehicle for spiritual and cultural expression for certain groups and individuals of a specific cultural group in South Africa. The koortjie tradition is part of the cultural narrative of the coloured church community and is a largely unexplored field of research. It is an area of music scholarship that Inge is undertaking to establish the Afrikaans koortjie as the focus of her research–an exemplary instance of orally transmitted racial music in the coloured community–an instance that will allows the broader coloured community to create for themselves a rightful place in the musical panorama of South African oral history and culture.

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Danell Müller

BIOGRAPHY

Danell Müller (Herbst) is lecturer in Music Education, Teaching Practice and Aural Training at the Department of Music, Stellenbosch University.

 

She completed her BMus studies (cum laude) in 2006 at North-West University, Potchefstroom where she specialized in Music Theory & Piano Methodology. Her final year dissertation, supervised by Hannes Taljaard, proposed an integrated approach to music theory instruction material. In 2011 she received her MMus degree (cum laude) in Music Theory Instruction & Music Education from North-West University, Potchefstroom under supervision of Hetta Potgieter and Seugnet Blignaut.

 

Danell is actively involved in Social Impact initiatives in Cloetesville at ATKV AbbaSorg and Rietenbosch Primary School. In 2013 she and social entrepreneur Andreas Claassens established The Moment Social Mobility Programme. This programme is aligned with the NDP and addresses 16 of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (also known as the Global Goals) and provide opportunity for Engaged Learning and Teaching, Engaged Research, Engaged Citizenship and Social Interaction.

 

RESEARCH

The provisional title for her research is ‘Staging the future: an auto-ethnographic account of how an annual school concert cultivates artistic citizenship’. In this research she will investigate how basic music activities in an underprivileged school environment could foster Artistic Citizenship and will also aim to explore the Self-Determination Theory as a pedagogical approach to music that shapes social relations and structures.

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Santie de Jongh

BIOGRAPHY

Santie de Jongh is the Special Collections Librarian at the Music Library and is responsible for the day to day running of the Music Special Collections, which include DOMUS. Her duties include the archival processing (ordering and conservation) of materials and postgraduate research support. She is actively involved in facilitating research on DOMUS collections, which includes advising music researchers on archival processing and preservation. Based on her archival work, her MMus degree (Stellenbosch University 2008) entailed the design and construction of a comprehensive national directory of music archives and special collections, which included visits to a number of archival repositories in South Africa. She is the South African Corresponding Editor for Fontes Artis Musicae and Chair of the continental steering committee of RILM.

RESEARCH

Her PhD topic is Music and Militarisation during the period of the South African Border War (1966-1989): Perspectives from ‘Paratus’ under the supervision of Stephanus Muller.

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BIOGRAPHY

Angie Mullins is a Johannesburg-based music educator and composer. She currently serves as Head of Music at Redhill High School and is a PhD student at Stellenbosch University’s Africa Open Institute.

 

Throughout her studies and career as a professional composer, Angie remained passionate about music education. She taught in a variety of settings, ranging from pre-primary school to adult education, and is constantly surprised and inspired by the countless ways in which music education can positively affect and transform young lives.

 

Angie is committed to the development of an inclusive, future-focused music curriculum that is accessible to all South African students, through technology and open content courses, and provides students with the competencies they will need to thrive in the 21st-century workplace.

RESEARCH

Under the expert guidance of her supervisor, Prof. Christine Lucia, Angie will conduct a case study of a future-focused music curriculum in action. This curriculum aims to meet the global expectations of general 21st-century education and develop the 21st-century competencies of analytical skills, interpersonal skills, ability to execute, information processing skills and capacity for change, in order to prepare students for a volatile and uncertain future characterized by exponential knowledge growth and technological progress.

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Annemie Behr

BIOGRAPHY

Annemie Behr (UNISA/Stellenbosch University) is a lecturer in musicology at the University of South Africa and a PhD-student at Stellenbosch University. She was accepted into UNISA’s Academic Qualifications Improvement Programme between 2015 and 2017, during which time she conducted research for her PhD project. She has published a book chapter on Afrikaans folk songs in Speculum Musicae (Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, 2014). Her articles and reviews appear in Tydskrif vir LetterkundeLitnet AkademiesMusicusJournal of the Musical Arts in AfricaTempoFontes Artis Musicae and SAMUS. She served as secretary for SASRIM (South African Society for Research in Music) and is currently reviews editor for Muziki.

RESEARCH

My research concerns a history of Jewish musical life in South Africa.

Methodologically, it involves the collecting, digitizing and reading of music content that appear in the South African Jewish Chronicle (first published in 1903) and the Zionist Record (first published in 1908), which then informs my PhD dissertation.

There are two tiers to the PhD project. The first involves compiling and developing an open access online database of music-related content derived from these newspapers. The undertaking is a collaboration between the National Library of South Africa, responsible for the digitisation of primary material, and the University of Stellenbosch, who hosts the database on their online depository called SUNDigital (see http://digital.lib.sun.ac.za/). The second tier pertains to the reading and representation of this material, using an electronic mode of content analysis.

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Pierre-Henri Wicomb

BIOGRAPHY
Pierre-Henri Wicomb, a South African composer, completed a Masters Degree in composition at the University of Cape Town and Post Graduate studies at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague and is currently working on his PhD at the institute Africa Open realising an Opera underpinned by the superimposition of two dyadic practices: psychoanalysis and music composition.
Wicomb is an acoustic composer, but also working in the field of electroacoustic music, which focusses on his experimentations with MIDI. Wicomb’s music has featured at the Festival D’Automne (Paris), New York City Electronic Music Festival (New York), International Computer Music Conference (ICMC, Utrecht), Avignon Festival, Forum Wallis 2013 and 2014 (Leuk, Switzerland), Wilde Bloesem series in Amsterdam, Infecting the City and Unyazi festivals (Cape Town) to name a few, including performances and broadcasts in Sweden, Mozambique, Portugal, Germany and Brazil. He together with a colleague founded the annual Purpur Festival for transgressive arts in Cape Town hosting national and international artists and composers. Wicomb curated the electroacoustic project ‘Concert To’ which included the works of 11 South African composers diffused at the Cape Town Train station, Sasol Arts Museum and festivals abroad, including the featuring of Wicomb’s piece Birds’ Birds over Radio France.
Wicomb has been a recipient of residencies in Switzerland, Sweden (VICC) and South Africa and winner of the  Fleur du Cap award for best original soundtrack or score, New Music SA commission competition and ensemble DissonArt’s miniature project. He has worked with ensembles such as L’Instant Donne, Ensemble Reconsil, Ensemble Insomnio, Asko ensemble, Stockholm Saxophone Quartet, South African New Music Ensemble (SANME) and the Kwazulu Natal Philharmonic Orchestra.
RESEARCH

This project is underpinned by the superimposition of two dyadic practices: psychoanalysis and music composition. The former is exemplified by the different approaches of a psychoanalyst and analysand/s; the latter of a composer and musician (free) improviser. A relationship comprising of a composer and an improvising ensemble is highly unusual because of both parties’ pre-occupation with dominance and authorship within a composition. The conventional composer requires the services of the interpretive musician responsible for performing his/her composition by faithful realisation of the closed score. I propose that these over-determined roles with disciplinary embedded interests be challenged and studied by casting the relational transactions (involving power, dominance, obedience, discipline, trust, safety, vulnerability, inter-subjective dynamics, etc.) between composer and performers as psychological processes. An improvisational opera that enacts these relational transactions, will provide a musical and intellectual laboratory for staging this idea.

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Minette du Toit-Pearce

BIOGRAPHY

Minette du Toit-Pearce (Senior lecturer in Voice) is the current Head of the Singing Division at Stellenbosch University’s Music Department. She began her vocal training in 1993 under the tutelage of Magdalena Oosthuizen. She received the degrees BMus, BMus (Hons) and MMus (Cum Laude) specializing in singing. She completed the University of South Africa (UNISA) Teachers and Performance Licentiates (both Cum Laude) and received the DJ Roode Overseas Scholarship, the Gertrude Buchanan and SAMRO prize during the UNISA bursary competitions. She was the overall winner of the ATKV Musiq competition as well as winner of the singing category and the Mozart prize. She was named first runner up in the SAMRO International Scholarship competition and also won the prize for best performance of a prescribed work. In 2009 she was a finalist in the Kohn Foundation Wigmore Hall International Song Competition in London. In 2010 she was also a finalist in the American Institute of Musical Studies’ (AIMS) Meistersinger Competition in Graz.

 

She regularly performs as a soloist in Oratorio and her repertoire includes Händel’s Messiah, the St Matthew’s Passion, St John’s Passion and B minor Mass by Bach, Stabat Mater by Pergolesi, Stabat Mater by Karl Jenkins and Mozart’s Requiem to name a few. Minette is an accomplished singer of lieder both locally and abroad and regularly performs at The Songmakers’ Guild in Cape Town. In 2017 she was nominated for a WoordTROfee for her performance of Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde. She has performed with all major orchestras in South Africa, most notably the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra and the Johannesburg Festival Orchestra.

 

Minette has performed at several National Arts Festivals in South Africa including the KKNK, Klein Karoo Klassique, AARDKLOP, Woordfees, Cultivaria, Suidooster Fees, Hermanus FynArts and Greyton Classics for All Festival. She has been nominated for three Kyknet Fiësta awards for her contribution to classical music at an arts festival. In 2015 she travelled to France and sang several concerts with the South African pianist Ilse Schumann

Minette regularly adjudicates at Eisteddfods and often travels outside of South Africa to Namibia and Zimbabwe to teach and perform. Since 2016 she has travelled to Maputo, Mozambique to perform at the Xiquitsi Mùsica Clàssica festival, where she also presented master classes. She is the head of the Singing Division at Stellenbosch University and fills the position of Senior Lecturer in Singing. She runs a very successful series of workshops “Working with Young Voices” and regularly presents these to teachers and singers. Minette will make her American debut later this year when she will be performing as soloist in Beethoven’s 9th Symphony with the Minnesota Orchestra in Minneapolis. She will also accompany the orchestra on their South African tour as part of their Mandela 100 celebrations.

RESEARCH

Her PhD research is on the archive of the South African Soprano Hanlie van Niekerk and aims to construct the first biography of her life and work. Her supervisor is Paula Fourie.

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Wayne Muller

BIOGRAPHY

Wayne Muller completed his Master’s Degree in Journalism at Stellenbosch University in 2001, after studying BA Sociology and an Honours Degree in Journalism. Since starting his career in community newspapers in 2000, he has been involved in arts journalism. After working in the magazine industry for three years, he joined Die Burger in Cape Town in October 2007 as Assistant Arts Editor and specialist writer on not only classical music and opera, but also dance and theatre. In 2011, he joined Stellenbosch University as a Publications Editor. His interest in music stems from an early start with piano lessons at the age of 7, and becoming a church organist in his teens. While a student in Stellenbosch he studied organ with Niel Pauw and singing with tenor Petrus van Heerden at the Stellenbosch Conservatoire. He is currently a singing student of Magdalena Oosthuizen.

He has served as a judge of classical music performances for the kykNET Fiesta Prizes, Kanna Awards (KKNK), the Hans Gabor Belvedere International Singing Competition (media jury), as well as the Fleur du Cape Theatre Awards. From 2009 to 2017, he produced an annual classical music concert for the Suidoosterfees, and has been a member on the festival programme selection committee of the Suidoosterfees, KKNK, Aardklop, and the Vryfees in Bloemfontein. He is co-editor of the oral history book, Eoan – Our Story, and is currently studying towards a PhD degree in Musicology at Stellenbosch University, focussing on the history of opera in Cape Town.

RESEARCH

Wayne’s research is aimed at constructing an historical narrative of the reception of opera performances in Cape Town between 1985 and 2015. The study is theoretically situated in reception theory, specifically as articulated in Musicology by Carl Dahlhaus in Foundations of Music History. Reception histories are built on the social responses to art, and in the case of this research project, opinions and views on opera were gathered from journalistic articles published specifically in the Western Cape daily newspapers, Die Burger and Cape Times. The research revisits the historiography of opera in South Africa and trances changes in the performance practices and views on the performed works. Themes such as transformation, contemporary relevance and the Africanisation of opera are explored as means of creating a distinctly South African operatic aesthetic.

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BIOGRAPHY

Mokale has taught at AMDA (Dorkay House), FUBA, Alexandra Arts Centre and Manu Technical College.

Mokale has performed with some the best-known musicians in the country, these include

Sibongile Khumalo, Bheki Khoza Motsumi Makhene, Wendy Mseleku, Gloria Bosman, Ntemi Piliso, Khaya Mahlangu, Prince Lengoasa, Philip Tabane and many more.

He has directed “Swing High, Sweet Gospel” (Arts Alive, 1993/4), “Sellout” (Grahamstown 1995) and arranged the music of Sibongile Mngoma’s performance at the Grahamstown Festival (1997).

Mokale is the music director of SDASA CHORALE, a gospel group that released an internationally acclaimed CD “SIMUNYE”, with a British vocal group, I Fagiolini.

Together with Motsumi Makhene, Sibongile Khumalo and Hugh Masekela, Mokale co-composed the music of “Milestones”, a musical by Mandla Langa. The musical won 1999 FNB SAMA’s Best Soundtrack Award.

In 2005, he was the composer-in-residence of the Consonance Festival in Rouen in France, under the artistic direction of the French virtuoso violinist, Philippe Graffin.

He orchestrated and conducted the music of Philip Tabane and Malombo for the 2006 “Soweto Arts Festival”.

In 2006, he was commissioned by the National Arts Festival to compose Cantus in Memoriam ’76 for choir and orchestra to celebrate the 20th anniversary of June 16, 1976.

In 2009 he was commissioned by South African Music Rights Organisation (SAMRO) to compose an orchestral piece Isijabane, for SANYO. In 2010, Classical Movements, a US based company commissioned him to compose a work for choir, Letlang Bana. In 2010, he was one of the 20 selected South African composers, whose works were included in The Bow Project CD recording.

In 2011, he was the inaugural composer-in-residence of the Johannesburg International Mozart Festival. In 2016 he composed On the Wings of Peace and Love, is based on the poem by Eugene Skeef.

Mokale was the conductor of the Meadowlands Zone 3 Choir of the SDA, music director of Clusters of the Harvest, SDASA Chorale and the associate conductor of the Oregon Adventist Men’s Chorus (USA).

Mokale has served as a member of the board of trustees of MIDI Trust (1996-2001), National Arts Festival, Grahamstown (1999-2015).

RESEARCH
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BIOGRAPHY

Visser Liebenberg is a versatile clarinet player and forms part of the Contrast Project brand. The Contrast Project is an innovative and daring group of professional musicians aiming for artistic collaboration with the main goal of pushing the boundaries of contemporary classical music. As a free-lance clarinetist, he actively performs as a soloist, chamber musician, and an ad-hoc clarinet player for Kwazulu-Natal Philharmonic and Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra. As clarinetist, he has a predilection for performing newly commissioned clarinet compositions, of all genres, written by South African composers.

RESEARCH

Artistic Research PhD.
My study is based in artistic research and more specifically artistic experimentation. This means that it privileges technical and sensorial knowledge as starting points to initiate innovative creative sound processes in ‘music practices’ with the clarinet as instrument. My work within artistic practice, intend to create opportunities for the translation of Western clarinet sound through staging its encounter with endogenous sounds. This I regard as an interrogation into the decolonisation of sound. The research question of this study thus centres around the desirability and possibilities of the decolonisation of sound through artistic experimentation for the creation of extended clarinet techniques.

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BIOGRAPHY

I am from the Netherlands. I studied musicology at the university of Amsterdam (Bachelor then Masters), graduating in 2017. During my studies in Amsterdam, I specialized more towards Ethnomusicology. . Aside from my musical interests I enjoy traveling, singing and various forms of being creative. I first became interested in South Africa through a combination of my interest in church music, ethnomusicology and travel. This led to me doing a six -month course (worship academy) in Pretoria in 2017. I am still based in the Netherlands, though I hope to move to South Africa soon.

RESEARCH

Between May 2016 and December 2016, I conducted fieldwork on refugee music projects in the Netherlands, specifically focusing on weekly music sessions in an asylum seeker centre in Utrecht as main case study. I also studied the performance context connected to these music sessions, where musicians from these sessions would perform with Dutch musicians. This fieldwork was the basis of my Master’s dissertation. My main research interests are music and social (justice) topics; such as music and (in)equality; music as mode of communication cross-culturally; music and reconciliation. I am also interested in local forms of church music.

For my PhD, I am still working on the best way to combine my interests in social justice topics with my interest in church music.

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BIOGRAPHY

Erika Jacobs is a trained concert flautist who has worked as a performing musician and teacher for 25 years, as a member of various orchestras and ensembles, and teaching at senior school and tertiary level. She has published several flute-related articles and has extensive experience as an examiner and adjudicator.

RESEARCH

Erika’s research interest concerns the question of expressivity and emotion in music performance, and in particular performance as creative practice. Her PhD study examines the artistic voice in music performance through the lens of critical complex thought.

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BIOGRAPHY

Nicola Deane is a contemporary artist working across a multiplicity of platforms and media, her primary research interest is in absence of presence and how it influences (mis-)interpretation.

RESEARCH

Decentering the Archive: Visual Fabrications of Sonic Memories is the working title of an interdisciplinary practice-based research project that engages archival material of DOMUS (Documentation Centre for Music) to create audiovisual media for a conceptual art installation.

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BIOGRAPHY

Grace started her doctoral studies in Music at Stellenbosch University in 2016 under the supervision of Prof. Stephanus Muller and recently with Dr. Paula Fourie as her second supervisor.

She completed her first degree in Music at the University of Lagos, Nigeria in 2010 with a second class upper grade and her Master of Arts degree in Music education from the same institution, where she graduated with a distinction in 2014. Prior to her studies at Stellenbosch University, she served as an assistant lecturer in the Music unit of the department of Communication and Performing Arts, Bowen University, Nigeria.

RESEARCH

Grace’s research focuses on the music and social meaning in the secular cantatas of Dayọ̀ Oyedun, a Nigerian composer of art music. Her study aims to contribute to African art music scholarship by applying musicological theory developed in Africa to the study of Oyedun’s cantata and, bringing into a sharper focus the theories and concepts. Oyedun’s choral compositions also represent a valuable entry point into a discussion of teaching moral ethics and values through music, engaging contemporary social challenges through music and creating social awareness as a means through which society is transformed. Her study therefore also seeks to make a contribution to the dissemination of his oeuvre, in connection with transformative musicology and its ethical imperatives.

On a more basic, historical level, her work intends to document the creative output of an important Nigerian composer. This documentation and critical analysis of his musical compositions will contribute to the wider work of the Documentation Centre for Music (DOMUS) at Stellenbosch University and will contribute to the broader study and accessibility of African art music, repertoires for musical performances and resources for libraries at Stellenbosch University, in Nigerian tertiary institutions, in Africa and the world.

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BIOGRAPHY

Boitumelo Tlhoaele is an independent curator and former journalist based in Johannesburg. Her research interests are on the intersections of jazz and visual art and the visual and music archives within the context of curatorial engagements. She has co-curated a group exhibition title: (2015) and Considering Genius (2016). Tlhoaele has recently completed her Master’s Degree in Heritage Studies at the University of Witwatersrand.

RESEARCH

Jazzuary Masterclass 2016

Curatorial Note
Edited by Boitumelo Tlhoaele

Considering Genius gives recognition to seven South African jazz greats, namely Dr Philip Tabane, Hugh Masekela, Johnny Dyani, Letta Mbulu, Louis Moholo-Moholo, Pat Matshikiza and Winston Mankunku Ngozi – through the artistic responses of six emerging contemporary artists alongside an established one.

The seven chosen musicians are but a handful in the canon of the jazz genre and are masters of their craft whose work isn’t always lauded or even known by the various publics despite the multi-dimensionality and significance of their work in the broader South African cultural history. These are creative forces, whose sounds have shaped, in many ways the current jazz milieu and as such should be played more often, studied and preserved.

Referencing American jazz critic and essayist Stanley Crouch through his book Considering Genius, the exhibition attempts to interrogate the historical settings of the music, the musicality of the compositions and the ever existing connection between jazz and the visual arts.

Under the umbrella theme of the Jazzuary Masterclass, the exhibition brings to light ideas of ingenuity, creation, historical moments and influences, heritage, public and personal memories.

It uncovers the notions of genius; what does it mean to be a genius and what burdens may or may not come with this state of being?

Considering Genius Inspired by the current, exciting and robust South African jazz scene, the exhibition also brings to contact the relationships between the “old” and “new”, young and old, the past and the future and the re-imaginings and negotiations of these seemingly disparate spaces.

Considering Genius invites the six artists, namely Ayanda Mabulu, Bambo Sibiya, Layziehound Coka, Malcolm Jiyane, Neo Matloga and Palesa Mopeli to create works that interrogate the music of the seven musicians. They are encouraged to respond to, reflect upon and interpret their music using their various forms of visual language.

Acclaimed photographer, Neo Ntsoma, makes up the seventh artist who presents a body of seven images, mainly taken at the Cape Town International Jazz Festival. Her artworks add more names to the list mentioned above as she offers images of some of her outstanding work she’s produced over the years. The exhibition sees various media including painting, print, and installation and a live performance, all of which function in conversation with the intricacies of jazz music as an art.

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