Affiliate academics

Dr
Janne
Rantala

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Dr
Annemari
Ferreira

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Dr
Lena
van
der
Hoven

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Dr
Jessica
Rucell

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Niklas
Zimmer

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Aryan
Kaganof

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Oladele
Ayorinde

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Dr
Juliana
M.
Pistorius

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David
Marks

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Dr
William
Fourie

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Dr
Wayne
Muller

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Dr
Mareli
Stolp

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Prof
Michael
Blake

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Prof
Jürgen
May

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Dr
Clare
Loveday

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Prof
Chris
Walton

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Janne Rantala

I am working in crossroads of memory studies, political history and hip hop, and specialised in Mozambican rap. I defended my thesis in cultural anthropology in 2017 at the University of Eastern Finland. At 2018-2019 I was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape (UWC). My recent works about Maputo rap include ‘‘Hidrunisa Samora’: Invocations of a Dead Political Leader in Maputo Rap’, published in the Journal of Southern African Studies (JSAS), and ‘Who has the word? MC Azagaia’s intervention into past and politics in Mozambique’ in Lusophone Hip-Hop anthology. I also contributed the second book about the topic (in Portuguese) widening my regional perspective to Beira and Chimoio, central Mozambique. I was winner of the Colin Murray Grant awarded annually by the JSAS ‘for engaged and original fieldwork’. I recently gave a talk about ambivalence of Samora Machel in Mozambican rap in the 2019 Annual African History Lecture of the UWC, and just before current corona restrictions I talked about sonic biography of Mozambican alternative hero Uria Simango in Africa Open Institute, Stellenbosch and in the Centro de Estudos Africanos, Maputo. I am a scientific coordinator of the Mozambican grass root research organisation Bloco 4 Foundation, and a member of an international hip hop collective Interligados. I designed a general theme for the group’s song ‘O Poder dos Fracos’ (Power of the Weak), which was broadcast in the Chuck D’s And You Don’t Stop show broadcast widely throughout the planet.

P.S. I am also an emergent radio feature maker. My first long feature (in Finnish) was based on my research and Maputo’s sounds, and was broadcast by the Finnish Broadcasting Company. I have also prepared shorter podcasts for instance for Mozambican hip hop radio programmes.

Janne Rantala

  • Colin Murray Award in 2017 for Postdoctoral Research in Southern Africa, Journal of Southern African Studies (JSAS) – author’s tips: https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/tips-to-get-motivated-for-2018-a-winners-story/

  • ‘‘Hidrunisa Samora’: Invocations of a Dead Political Leader in Maputo Rap’ in the JSAS: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/A948XGJqG2uxbPry7nsh/full

  • Pöysä, Anna & Rantala, Janne (2018). Who has the Word? MC Azagaia’s Intervention into Past and Politics in Mozambique in Lusophone Hip-hop: ’Who We Are’ and ‘Where We Are’: Identity, Urban Culture and Belonging (with Anna Pöysä).

  • 'Antepassados políticos’ através do rap Moçambicano’ in Reinventar o Discurso e o Palco: O RAP, entre saberes locais e olhares globais

  • ’War in Peace. The Return of Civil War in Mozambique?’, with Daniel Kaiser: http://www.sicherheitspolitik-blog.de/2016/04/27/war-in-peace-the-return-of-civil-war-in-mozambique/

  • ’Youth and Masquerades in Colonial and Postcolonial Mozambique’ in the JSAS: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/QRdDPkj9k5BBzQGckYRX/full

Janne Rantala

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Dr Annemari Ferreira

Annemari is an Associate Professor of English as a Foreign Language at Woosong University, South Korea. Her research, art and teaching interests concern the politics of the interpersonal. Taking a trans-disciplinary approach to the interpretation and mediation of communication, her work explores the meaning-making that occurs in, and stems from, ‘in-between’ spaces of verbal and non-verbal expression. Her ongoing preoccupation with dialogue informs an attempt to explore the political dimensions of the ‘in-between’ and its employment in political discourse.

Annemari’s research continues to engage with early medieval literatures that provide rich source material for the study of politically-rooted cultural discourse. Her most recent research projects (including her Doctoral thesis, undertaken at the University of Oxford) explore the politics of performance in Viking Age skaldic poetry (in particular the role of dialogue in the construction of skaldic diplomacy).

In addition to teaching, Annemari co-runs an interdisciplinary research network on Old Norse Poetry in Performance which seeks to facilitate conversations between academics and practitioners in literary, musical and dramaturgical fields on the subject of Old Norse-Icelandic poetic performance in both historical and contemporary contexts.

Links:
https://sites.google.com/site/dialogicthings/

https://oldnorsepoetryinperformance.com/

Dr Annemari Ferreira

  • ‘Tíð, Tíðindi: Skaldic Verse as Performance Event’, in Performing Medieval Text, ed. by Ardis Butterfield, Henry Hope and Pauline Souleau (Cambridge: Legenda, 2017), 53-69

  • 'Life in Viking Age Ireland' with Rachel Backa in The Vikings in Munster, ed. Tom Birkett and Christina Lee, p.7-19 (2014)

  • ‘“Passionate, curiously-coloured things”: Chameleon sexuality in Ek herhaal jou’, in Journal of the Musical Arts in Africa, Jan 1, 2008

Dr Annemari Ferreira

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Dr Lena van der Hoven

Lena van der Hoven has been Assistant Professor for Musicology at the University of Bayreuth since 2015. She received a PhD in Musicology from the Humboldt University of Berlin for a dissertation on the Politics of Musical Representation in Prussia from 1688 to 1797. She was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Max Planck Institute for Human Development. Since 2016 she has been a member of the Young Scholars’ Program of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Through the EUR∞SA-Program she won a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Africa Open Institute in Stellenbosch (2017-2018). In 2018 she received the Scientific Award of the University of Bayreuth for her research on South African Opera.

 

Her research interests include the diverse entanglements of opera and music theatre with politics and their function in societies. Her present focus for her Habilitation project lies in contemporary South African opera productions, with a special interest in the transformation of the genre in the socio-political context. She is also a member of the DFG project ‘Opera buffa as a European Phenomenon. Migration, Mapping, and Transformation of a New Genre’ at the University of Bayreuth.

She was the convener of several symposia, a conference and workshop with topics as ‘Music and Democracy’ (2015), the 450th anniversary of Staatskapelle Berlin (2015-2016), ‘South African Opera Productions after the Apartheid’ (2018), and transformation processes of opera through new media and digitalisation (2019). She has presented at conferences in Germany, South Africa, the UK, Sweden, Finland, France, Italy and Brazil. Soon to be published is a volume on opera and music theatre in Africa, which she co-edited in the Boydell & Brewer series ‘African Theatre’. In this volume she also co-authored a chapter on black empowerment in the South African opera adaptations Unogumbe (2013) and Breathe – Umphefumlo (2015) from the Isango Ensemble.

 

 

Selection of Grants and Funds

2018 WIN-UBT Conference Grant for Symposium “South African Opera productions”,    Bayreuth

2018 Grant of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences for the Workshop “Oper im Wechselspiel der Medien”, Munich 2019

2018 DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) Congress Grant for the Conference of the South African Research in Musicology 2018 in Durban

2017/2018  EUR∞SA grant for Postdoc-Fellowship at Stellenbosch University

2017 DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) Congress Grant for IFTR-Conference 2017 in Sao Paulo

2016/2017 Small grant, Bureau of the Equal Opportunity Commissioner, University of Bayreuth

2016 DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) Congress Grant for IFTR-Conference 2016 in Stockholm

2016-2022 Grant, Junges Kolleg of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences

2015 Third-party grant, Hertie Foundation for the conference Actors, Institutions – Practices, Discourses

2015 Third-party grant for the Symposium of the Staatskapelle from the Foundation Preußische Seehandlung

2014-2015 Post-Doc Grant, Max Planck Institute for Human Development

2008-2011 PhD Grant, Evangelisches Studienwerk e.V. Villigst

 

Dr Lena van der Hoven

  • Musikalische Repräsentationspolitik in Preußen (1688-1797). Hofmusik als Inszenierungsinstrument von Herrschaft . Kassel: Bärenreiter 2015 (Musiksoziologie, vl. 19).

  • • with Melanie Wald-Fuhrmann, „La musique, c’est moi.“ Friedrichs II. klingender Weg zur historischen Größe. Berlin: Vergangenheitsverlag 2013.

  • • 2020 with Christine Matzke, Christopher Odhiambo and Hilde Roos, African Theatre 19: Opera and Music Theatre. Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer 2020. (in print)

  • • 2016-2017 450 Jahre Staatskapelle Berlin – eine Bestandsaufnahme, Kulturgeschichte Preußens – Colloquien (www.perspectivia.net)

  • • with Liani Maasdorp, ‘Opera is an art form for everyone’. Black empowerment in the South African opera adaptations Unogumbe (2013) and Breathe – Umphefumlo (2015), In Christine Matzke, Lena van der Hoven, Christopher Odhiambo and Hilde Roos (eds) African Theatre 19: Opera and Music Theatre. Suffolk: Boydell Brewer 2020. (peer reviewed and in print)

  • • ‘We can’t let politics define the arts’. Interviews with South African Opera Singers, In Christine Matzke, Lena van der Hoven, Christopher Odhiambo and Hilde Roos (eds) African Theatre 19: Opera and Music Theatre. Suffolk: Boydell Brewer 2020. (peer reviewed and in print)

  • • with Christine Matzke, Hilde Roos and Christopher Odhiambo ‘Introduction’, In Christine Matzke, Lena van der Hoven, Christopher Odhiambo and Hilde Roos (eds) African Theatre 19: Opera and Music Theatre. Suffolk: Boydell Brewer 2020. (in print)

  • • ‘Residenzen und Schlösser’, In Anna Langenbruch and Gesa zur Nieden (eds) Handbuch Orte und Räume der Musik. Laaber: Laaber-Verlag. (Reihe Musik der Klassik und Romantik, Bd. 4) (in print)

  • • ‘Herrschaftsrepräsentation‘, In Daniel Morat and Hansjakob Ziemer (eds) Handbuch Sound. Geschichte – Begriffe – Ansätze. Sttuttgart: J.B. Metzler Verlag 2018: 382-386.

  • • ‘Einige (musik-)historiographische Überlegungen zu den Krisen- und Blütezeiten der Königlich Preußischen Hofkapelle zwischen 1713 und 1806‘, In Lena van der Hoven (ed.) 450 Jahre Staatskapelle Berlin – eine Bestandsaufnahme: Krisen und Blütezeiten. Die Entwicklung der Königlich Preußischen Hofkapelle von 1713 bis 1806. Beiträge in der Reihe "Kulturgeschichte Preußens - Colloquien" vom 07. bis 10. Oktober 2016, Online: https://www.perspectivia.net/publikationen/kultgep-colloquien/6/hoven_einleitung.

  • • ‘Einführung‘, In Lena van der Hoven and Jürgen Luh (eds) 450 Jahre Staatskapelle Berlin: Die Entwicklung der Hofmusik von der kurfürstlichen Kapelle von Brandenburg zum Hoforchester des ersten Königs in Preußen. Beiträge des dritten Colloquiums in der Reihe "Kulturgeschichte Preußens - Colloquien" vom 16. bis 18. Oktober 2015, Online: https://www.perspectivia.net/publikationen/kultgep-colloquien/3/van-der-hoven_einleitung.

  • • with Morten Grage: Tagungsbericht: Krisen und Blütezeiten. Die Entwicklung der Königlich Preußischen Hofkapelle von 1713 bis 1806. Symposion 450 Jahre Staatskapelle Berlin, 07.10.2016 – 09.10.2016 Berlin, in: H-Soz-Kult, 05.01.2017, www.hsozkult.de/conferencereport/id/tagungsberichte-6921.

  • • with Christian Katschmanowski: Fürst und Fürstin als Künstler. Herrschaftliches Künstlertum zwischen Habitus, Norm und Neigung, Rudolstädter Arbeitskreis zur Residenzkultur, Herzog August Bibliothek, 9. bis 11. Oktober 2014, Wolfenbüttel, Gesellschaft für Musikforschung. (ausführliche musikwissenschaftliche Sektion)

  • • with Julia Stenzel: „Wir erzeugen unsere eigenen Erfahrungen“: Zum Verhältnis von Theater, Wissenschaft und Öffentlichkeit. In: Akademie aktuell (Heft 2, Nr. 61), 2017: 62-67.

  • • Radio-Features: SR 2 – MusikWelt (2015), RBB Kulturradio (2015), WDR – Tonart (2019)

  • • Music at Sanssouci. The court of Frederick the Great, Harmonia mundi collection: Resonances. Music and Monuments, HMX2908556.57, 2016.

  • • articles for programme book for Musikfestspiele Potsdam Sanssouci 2012 and Staatsoper Unter den Linden 2006 & 2012.

Dr Lena van der Hoven

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Jessica Rucell

Dr. Jessica Rucell

 

Jessica is an expert in international development, gender inequality and has worked in the United States, Asia and Africa. She has directed programs, research and advocacy on violence against women, cultural preservation and humanitarian response. Her contributions have had practical impact on policy, service delivery and advocacy. Jessica’s work through AOI aims to expand South African art and literary canons and respond to the call to decolonise South African university research and teaching.

 

Her training is interdisciplinary. Jessica applies archival, quantitative and qualitative methods to her research and has taught sociology, human rights law, and history. She holds a PhD in Politics and International Development, University of Leeds, UK; a MA in Development Studies, University of Rotterdam, Institute of Social Studies, NL, and a BA in Asian Studies, The New School University, US.

 

Jessica Rucell

Jessica Rucell

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Niklas Zimmer

I hold an MA(FA) and a BA(Hons) from University of Cape Town, as well as a BA in education from University of Cologne. My research MA on South African Jazz photographydrew critical reflections on Fine Arts, Social history and Music. Before my employment at UCT Libraries in 2015 as manager of the Digital Library Services department, I worked as digitisation manager at the Centre for Popular Memory (UCT), as an art teacher, heading the Visual Arts Department at the German International School Cape Town, and as an archivist at the Art and Exhibition Hall of the Federal Republic of Germany. In between, I have maintained a richly diverse freelance career, including lecturing in theory and discourse of art and critical studies at tertiary institutions in Cape Town and Stellenbosch, giving workshops in video, sound and photography, as well as writing reviews, exhibiting my photographic art, and performing as a drummer in the free improvisation ensemble ‘As Is.’ I am a research associate at Africa Open Institute for Music, Research and Innovation at Stellenbosch University.

Niklas Zimmer

  • • Niklas Zimmer (2015) Percival Kirby’s wax cylinders: elegy on archiving a deaf spot, Social Dynamics, 41:1, 101-123, DOI: 10.1080/02533952.2014.988931

  • • Peters, D., Brenzinger, M., Meyer, R., Noble, A., & Zimmer, N. (2015). The digital library in the re-inscription of African cultural heritage. IFLA Journal, 41(3), 204–210. https://doi.org/10.1177/0340035215603990

Niklas Zimmer

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Aryan Kaganof is a project of African Noise Foundation

List of films produced by AOI – Stellenbosch University.

 

The (missing) Legend of Jiwe (42min23sec) 2018

A Word As Heavy As Bullets (27min50sec) 2018

nege fragmente uit ses khoi psalms (20min59sec) 2018

Graham Newcater – Of Fictalopes and Jictology (6min56sec) 2018

Suiwer (47min08sec) 2017

Daniel-Ben Pienaar: Removing The Room (6min17sec) 2017

Hauntology For Mark Fisher (4min12sec) 2017

Say It With Flowers (24min24sec) 2017

Roesdorp Naklank (3min38sec) 2017

String Quartet #3 For Four Cameras (28min36sec) 2017

Metalepsis in Black (82min09sec) 2016

Your Silence Is Painful (13min05sec) 2016

khoisan ghost kreun (16min33sec) 2016

Opening Stellenbosch: From Assimilation To Occupation (104min54sec) 2016

Kreun (17min01sec) 2016

Threnody For The Victims of Marikana (16min26sec) 2015

Night Is Coming (66min17sec) 2014

An Inconsolable Memory (99min02sec) 2014

Stellenbosched (9min07sec) 2013

 

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Oladele Ayorinde

Oladele Ayorinde, educator, pianist and cultural entrepreneur, is a ‘THInK’ (Transforming the Humanities through Interdisciplinary Knowledge) Doctoral Fellow at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), Johannesburg, South Africa. Recently, he was also appointed as a Research Fellow of the Africa Open Institute for Music, Research and Innovation, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa. Situated within Music and Anthropology, Oladele’s research project is exploring the nexus between music, agency and social transformation in contemporary Africa. His Master’s thesis entitled Dizu Plaatjies and the Amampondo: music, agency and social transformation explored how music and music-making could inform social and economic empowerment among the previously disadvantaged people in South Africa. His research shows how social agencies draw on music as social and cultural capital to negotiate a place in the socio-economic and socio-political structure of pre-and–post-1994 South Africa. According to him, discourse on ‘transformation’ should be re-focused on social and economic empowerment of the South African people, especially the previously disadvantaged people. In his PhD studies, focusing on Fuji music – a contemporary Yoruba popular music form – Oladele is exploring how the so called ‘street musicians’ are re-imagining the society through their music, music-making and ‘associated practices’, and how this enterprise is informing socio-cultural, political and economic transformation in Lagos. More specifically, through the lens of Fuji music and its agencies, his research aims to understand processes of cultural and socio-economic empowerment strategies among Fuji musicians in Lagos, Nigeria.

Oladele Ayorinde

  • Ayorinde, O. (forthcoming). “Negotiating Change, Preserving Tradition: Music, Performance and the Transformation of Eyo Festival of Lagos, Nigeria”. In Africa.

  • Ayorinde, O. (2018). “‘Unholy Trinity’ and ‘Transformation’ in Post-1994 South Africa: Re-focusing ‘Transformation’ in Higher Education for Social and Economic Empowerment”. In Leeds African Studies Bulletin, 80: 42-59.

  • Ayorinde, O. and Sunu Doe, E. (2018). “’African Music’, an Elusive Concept: Rethinking Music Education and Scholarship for Social and Economic Development in Africa”. Pistorius, M (ed.), Conference Proceedings of the South African Society for Research in Music (SASRIM) 2017, 29 - 44.

  • Ayorinde, O. (2017). “Musical Arts Education for Cultural, Social and Economic Development in Africa: Possibilities and Practice”. In Journal of Musical Art Education, 1 (2): 15-29.

Oladele Ayorinde

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Juliana M. Pistorius

Juliana M. Pistorius is a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at the University of Huddersfield. She received a DPhil in Musicology from the University of Oxford in 2018. Her research investigates opera, migration, and the politics of coloniality and decoloniality in apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa. As the managing editor of SAMUS: South African Music Studies, she takes an interest in matters of access and linguistic diversification. She is Treasurer of the South African Society for Research in Music (SASRIM).

Juliana M. Pistorius

  • ‘Coloured Opera as Subversive Forgetting’, Social Dynamics: A Journal of African Studies, 43(2), 2017, 230-242.

  • ‘Eoan, Assimilation, and the Charge of “Coloured Culture”’, SAMUS: South African Music Studies, 36/37, 389-415.

  • ‘Decolonising Music: A Response and Three Positions’ (with N. Muyanga, W. Fourie and C. Venter), SAMUS: South African Music Studies, 36/37, 129-156.

  • ‘Inhabiting Whiteness: The Eoan Group La Traviata, 1956’, Cambridge Opera Journal (forthcoming).

  • Stephanus Muller, Nagmusiek [Night Music], in Fontes Artis Musicae, 62(2), 2015, 130-32.

  • Eoan History Project, Eoan: Our Story, in Muziki: Journal of Music Research in Africa, 14(1), 2017, 140-43.

  • William Kentridge and Philip Miller, The Head and the Load [Performance Art], SAMUS: South African Music Studies, 38, 2018 (forthcoming).

Juliana M. Pistorius

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David Marks

David Marks works as a musician, songwriter, sound engineer, and producer of South African music. In 1971 he took over as the director of the 3rd Ear Music Company, a small independent record company interested in recording, promoting and producing music that was not considered as commercially viable or seen as too political by the major record companies.

 

Through his work as a sound engineer and the director of the 3rd Ear Music Company, Marks amassed a collection of material that documents South African music from the mid 1960s to the early 2000s. In 1990 Marks formed the Hidden Years Music Archive Project to safeguard and preserve the material he collected. The collection has been estimated to contain around 175 000 items, amounting to seven tons of material that documents diverse musical styles ranging from urban folk to township jazz, country rock, choirs, maskanda and traditional musics.

 

David Marks

  • Marks engineered and produced over 100 records, including records for the South African Folk Music Association, Hawk, Mike Dickman, John Oakley-Smith, Brian Finch Jannie Hofmeyr, and the hard rock group of Piet Botha called Raven. A selective list of releases includes:

  • Malombo, Music of the Spirit (1971, 3ee 001)

  • Flibbertigibbet, Whistling Jigs to the Moon (1976, 3ee 7002)

  • Paul Clingman, Father to the Child, (1977, 3ee 7000)

  • Marks formed the Look South record label with Hugh Masekela, to release the album Hugh Masekela, Live in Lesotho (3ee 7006)

  • Colin Shamley, Born Guilty (1978, 3ee 7005)

  • Roger Lucey, The Road is Much Longer (1979, 3ee 7004)

  • Laurika Rauch’s “Kinders van die Wind”

  • David Scobie’s “Gypsey Girl”

  • 1965-1968 Compose various songs including Master Jack, Mr. Nico, Mountains of Men, Fairygold, and Hey Mister. Master Jack was recorded by the music group Four Jacks and a Jill in 1968. The song was number eight on the American Billboard hot 20, and number one in South Africa, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Malaysia and Zimbabwe.

  • 1968 Won a Sarie award for song of the year for his composition Master Jack.

  • 1968 Worked at the International Library of African Music for Hugh Tracey.

  • 1968 Co-founder of the Natal Folk Music Association (NAFMA) in Durban with Bob Wilson and Verlein “Ginger” Seipp.

  • 1969 Worked for the Bill Hanley Sound Company based in Boston America. As part of this team, Marks did the sound for musicians and groups including The Rolling Stones, Joan Baez, Donovan, Hoyt Axton, the Turtles, and Jimi Hendrix. Marks worked at the Newport Folk Festival and the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair.

  • 1969 First time to mix sound live at the Live Peace in Toronto festival for John Lennon’s Plastic Ono Band.

  • 1970 Ran the TOTUM club in Durban with Richie Morris and Brian Finch.

  • 1970-1976 In collaboration with Tony Campbell, established and ran an annual multi-racial concert, Free People Concert, Wits Campus.

  • 1971-2018 Director of the 3rd Ear Music Company, an independent record and publishing company.

  • 1971-1973 Serve as the Chair of South African Folk Music Association (SAFMA)

  • 1973 Worked with Des and Dawn Lindberg on the theatre project Godspell in Maseru, Lesotho. Show was banned by South African apartheid government but later allowed to be performed after the Lindberg’s won their court appeal.

  • 1976-1979 Worked alongside Mannie Manim and Barney Simon at the Market Theatre in Johannesburg where he and his wife, Frances Marks, ran the Market Theatre Café.

  • 1980 Established Le Chaim (coffee club) in collaboration with Tony Campbell and Dave Berman; established the Chelsea Underground (coffee club) with Rodney Barnet and Stan James, Roger Lucey and Dr Randy Speer; established Le Plaza for Paul Mikula and Ian Lindsay’s hotel.

  • Worked for Peter Hubner and Ton Den Tueling’s record company, Emcdee (Cape Town) and Dave Emery’s Corporate Planning in Four Ways (Johannesburg) recording and producing audio visual soundtracks for major corporations.

  • 1987 Founding member of the Musician’s Association of Natal (MANA)

  • 1989 Co-founder of the Natal Cultural Council (NCC), Durban

  • 1989 Serves on the transition board of the Playhouse/NAPAC, Durban.

  • 1990-1995 Involved in founding the annual festival Splashy Fen, the longest running music festival in South Africas, as Sound Engineer.

  • 1994 Produced the first “official” music event to take place in South Africa in the New Democracy with the singer-songwriter Shawn Philips and the veteran folk music promoter Theo Coetzee, on 27 April 1994.

  • 1995 Tour with Kinky Friedman in South Africa

  • 1996 Tour with legendary Crosby, Stills and Nash in South Africa

  • Other musicians Marks toured with as a sound engineer in Southern Africa from 1970 includes Mungo Jery (Ray Dorset), Rod McKuen, Uri Geller, Isaac Hayes, Jimmy Smith, Stanley Turentine, Spike Milligan, Margaret Singana, Richard Jon Smith, Johnny Clegg and Sipho Mchunu, Ladymsith Black Mambaso, Percy Sledge, and Stephan Grappelli.

  • 1997 Marks record his debut album, The Hidden Years, featuring 72 musicians Marks worked with since 1964, including Hugh Masekela, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Jonny Blundell, Loraine Shannon, Robin Walsh, Wendy Oldfield, Anton Goosen, Edi Niederlander, Brian Finch, Aaron Jakes Lerole, Colin Shamley, Manfred Mann, Roger Lucey etc.

  • Invited to perform at the Anniversary of the Woodstock Music Festival on Maz Yasgur’s farm in Bethel, USA.

  • 1999 Directed Guitars for Africa at WOMAD for Dan Choirboli.

  • Produced the Living Treasures Festival on the beach at St Lucia featuring musicians from 21 countries. Organised in collaboration with the Lombombo Spatial Development Initiative in association with Dan Choirboli’s Shongweni Living Treasures project.

  • Training of rural communities in music festival related events along the LSDI/Mozambique development route (including the communities of the Dudukuku forest settlements, Hlahluwe, Matubatubu, Richards Bay, Empangeni and St Lucia. This was set-up and managed in collaboration with Chris Faya and Mandy Lohner for Andrew Zaloumis’ LSDI project.

  • 1990-2012 Worked as the archivist for the Hidden Years Music Archive Project.

  • 2000-2010 Involved in the selection process of South African musicians for the R.E.M.Y. festival in Cameroon and Nantes 2000 in France; Shuttle 99 for Norway, and Roskillda in Denmark.

  • 2012 Donate the Hidden Years music archive to the Documentation Centre for Music, Stellenbosch University.

  • 2012-2018 Work as a research consultant and archivist for the Volkswagen Funded Research Project, directed by Dr Lizabé Lambrechts, Senior Research Fellow, Africa Open Institute, Stellenbosch University.

  • 1966 Fanagalo Instruction manual for the Spring mines outside of Johannesburg

  • 1977 Monthly column in music magazine Down the Line, Durban.

  • 1970-1990 Various newspaper contributions about music, the state of music and broadcasting in South Africa for the English press including The Star and Rand Daily Mail.

  • 2010-2018 Preparing a biographical manuscript detailing the life and work of David Marks that led to the creation of the Hidden Years music archive.

David Marks

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Dr William Fourie

William Fourie is an associate research fellow at Stellenbosch University’s Africa Open Institute for Music, Research and Innovation. He holds a PhD from Royal Holloway, University of London. His doctoral project used a hermeneutic approach to considered issues of musical modernism in post-apartheid South Africa. He also holds a master’s degree in musicology from Merton College, University of Oxford and a BMus from Stellenbosch University. He won a number of prestigious scholarships during his studies, including a Clarendon Scholarship at the University of Oxford and a Oppenheimer Memorial Trust Scholarship at Royal Holloway.

William has published in a number of leading journals including Twentieth-Century Music and Tempo on topics spanning decoloniality, the musicological discipline, and more focused interpretative work on a number of contemporary South African composers. He regularly presents at conferences around the world and has been an invited speaker at the University of Bayreuth and the University of Cape Town. He recently co-authored a chapter on Jacques Rancière and music for Edinburgh University Press and has also edited conference proceedings published with Brill.

A keen arts administrator, William has worked on a number of contemporary music festivals and has curated a festival for experimental electronic music at the University of Cape Town. He also served as the Chair of the International Society of Contemporary Music’s South African section, NewMusicSA, and has been involved in various ways in the production and dissemination of new music in the country.

 

Dr William Fourie

  • ‘Musicology and Decolonial Analysis in the Age of Brexit’, Twentieth-Century Music 17:2 (2020), 197–211 DOI: 10.1017/S1478572220000031.

  • ‘Spectral Resistance in Andile Khumalo’s “Bells Die Out”’, Perspectives of New Music (special issue on Africa) (Peer-review article. Forthcoming: accepted for publication, pp. 24, c. 8,000 words).

  • ‘Between the Musical Anti- and Post-Apartheid: Structures of Crisis in Kevin Volans’s String Quartet No. 5, “Dancers on a Plane”’, SAMUS: South African Music Studies 39. (Peer-review article. Forthcoming: in production, pp. 35, c. 14,600 words).

  • Venter, C., W. Fourie, J. M. Pistorius and N. Muyanga, ‘Decolonising Musicology: A Response and Three Positions’, SAMUS: South African Music Studies 36/37 (2018), 129-154, https://www.ajol.info/index.php /samus/article/view/173493.

  • ‘Splinter and Loss: Reading Clare Loveday’s “Johannesburg Etude 2”’, SAMUS: South African Music Studies 36/37 (2018), 464-489, https://www.ajol.info/index.php/samus/article/view/173521.

  • ‘Reading Skylines: Expanding Musicological Discourse in Post-Apartheid South Africa’, Muziki: Journal of Music Research in Africa 11:2 (2014), 4-18, DOI: 10.1080/18125980.2014.966482.

  • ‘African Studies, Special Cluster: New Voices in Black South African Opera, 75:1 (2016)’, African Theatre 19. (Forthcoming: in production, pp. 5, c. 1,700 words).

  • ‘Kevin Volans: piano:string quartet:chopin, x:y:k. Melvyn Tan, Calefax, Signum Quartet. Wigmore Hall, 11 December 2019’, Tempo 74:293 (2020), 85–6. DOI: 10.1017/S0040298220000042

  • ‘Heart of Redness by Neo Muyanga’, Muziki: Journal of Music Research in Africa 12:2 (2016), 99-103. DOI: 10.1080/18125980.2015.1127627

  • ‘Lingering Absences’, Art South Africa 12:2 (2013), 83-86.

  • Fourie, W. and C. Venter, ‘Coloured Opera and the Violence of Dis-identification’ in Rancière and Music (eds.) J. P. Cachopo, P. Nickleson and C. Stover (2020, Edinburgh University Press). (Book chapter).

  • ‘Spectral Dissensus: Politics in Andile Khumalo’s “Bells Die Out”’ in SASRIM 2017 Conference Proceedings (ed.) Mareli Stolp (SASRIM, 2019), 2-11.

  • Fourie, W (ed.) Urban Assemblage: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. (2016, Brill). (Non-peer-reviewed edited volume, ISBN: 978-1-84888-458-8).

  • ‘Introduction: Reading into the Spaces between Different Speeds, Dates and Subjectivities’ in Urban Assemblage: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (ed.) W. Fourie (2016, Brill), i-x. (Chapter in non-peer-reviewed edited volume)

  • ‘Silent Lines: Urban Space and the Aesthetics of Crime’, in Urban Assemblage: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (ed.) W. Fourie (2016, Brill), 15-24. (Chapter in non-peer-reviewed edited volume).

  • ‘Performing Rzewski’s Coming Together/ Attica: A Manifesto’, NewMusicSA Bulletin 11/12 (2013), 30–1. (Manifesto in societal bulletin, ISSN: 1684-0399).

Dr William Fourie

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Wayne Muller

In December 2018, Wayne Muller received his PhD degree in Musicology from Stellenbosch University with a thesis titled, A reception history of opera in Cape Town: Tracing the development of a distinctly South African operatic aesthetic (1985–2015). This study revisited the historiography of opera in South Africa and traced changes in the performance practices and views on the performed works. Themes such as transformation, contemporary relevance and the Africanisation of opera are explored as means of creating a distinctly South African operatic aesthetic. His research interest is in the history and performance of opera in post-apartheid South Africa. He complete a Master’s Degree in Journalism at Stellenbosch University in 2001, after studying BA Sociology and an Honours Degree in Journalism. Since starting his career in community newspapers in 2000, he has been involved in arts journalism. After working in the magazine industry for three years, he joined Die Burger in Cape Town in October 2007 as Assistant Arts Editor and specialist writer on not only classical music and opera, but also dance and theatre. In 2011, he joined Stellenbosch University as a Publications Editor. His interest in music stems from an early start with piano lessons at the age of 7, and becoming a church organist in his teens. While a student in Stellenbosch, he studied organ with Niel Pauw and singing with tenor Petrus van Heerden at the Stellenbosch Conservatoire, and is currently a singing student of Magdalena Oosthuizen. He  has served as a judge of classical music performances for the kykNET Fiesta Prizes, Kanna Awards (KKNK), the Hans Gabor Belvedere International Singing Competition (media jury), as well as the Fleur du Cape Theatre Awards. From 2009 to 2017, he produced an annual classical music concert for the Suidoosterfees, and has been a member of the festival programme selection committees of the Suidoosterfees, KKNK, Aardklop, and the Vryfees in Bloemfontein. He is co-editor of the oral history book, Eoan – Our Story.

Wayne Muller

Wayne Muller

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Mareli Stolp

Mareli Stolp completed Bachelor of Music (2002) and Master of Music (2006) degrees at the University of Pretoria. Between 2003 and 2006, she was a student at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam in the Netherlands, where she studied with pianist Håkon Austbø, completing a Bachelor of Music Degree at the Conservatory of Amsterdam in 2006. She completed an Artistic Research PhD at the University of Stellenbosch with Professor Stephanus Muller in 2012.

 

Her main research interests are artistic research and South Africa music history and historiography.

Mareli Stolp

  • 2018: New music for new South Africans: the New Music Indabas in South Africa, 2000-2002. Journal of the Royal Musical Association Volume 142 (1), pp. 211-232.

  • 2016: Report to the Academy: On Power and Ethics. Acta Academica Volume 48 (1), 2016.

  • 2016: Settling the Score: Music and the Performer-Creator Approach in Nicola Elliott’s ‘Run’!. South African Theatre Journal Volume 29, 2016.

  • 2016: ‘Thinking Through’ Voyeur Piano: Strategies and Outcomes for an Artistic Research Project. De Arte Volume 51 (1), 2016.

  • 2016: Van Opera tot ‘Politopera’: nuwe strominge in Suid-Afrikaanse Opera Komposisie en Resepsie. LITNET Akademies March 2016.

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  • 2015: Analyzing ‘from the inside out’: Frederic Rzewski’s ‘De Profundis’ from a Performer’s Perspective. SAMUS Volume 35, 2015.

  • 2013: Yemoja in Momente: ‘n Uitvoerderperspektief. Tydskrif vir Geesteswetenskappe 53/2. 2013.

  • 2012: Practice-based Research in Music: International Perspectives, South African Challenges. SAMUS 32, 2012.

  • 2011: Review Article: Beethoven Sonatas for Piano and Cello; Peter Martens (cello) and Luis Magalhaes (piano). SAMUS Volume 30/31, 2011.

  • 2017: Guest Editor: Clare Loveday, Composer at 50. Editorial and extended interview. SAMUS Volume 36/37.

  • 2016: Response to the Academy. Acta Academica Volume 48 (2).

  • 2016: Review: Shana L. Redmond: Anthem: Social Movements and the Sound of Solidarity in the African Diaspora. 1st Edition. 2014. 345 pp. ISBN number 978-0-8147-7041-2. Muziki Volume 13.

  • 2013: Performing contemporary music in present-day South Africa: An interview with Jill Richards. New Music SA Bulletin issue 9/10, 2010-2011.

  • 2012: LITNET Akademies: Jack Parow se “Tussen stasies”: uniek of stereotiep?

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  • 2012: LITNET Akademies: Lang Lang – Enkele opmerkings oor vertoonkuns, verhoogkuns en virtuositeit.

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  • 2007: Transcending Time: Messiaen’s Approach to Time in Music. MUSICUS 2007/2.

  • 2007: MMUS Dissertation published by VDM Publishing, Germany as Transcending Time: Messiaen’s Approach to Time in Music, ISBN 978-3-639-09574-6

  • 2018: The 2017 DHET Policy on the Evaluation of Creative Outputs and Innovations: questions, challenges, new directions. Paper to be presented at the South African Society for Research in Music Annual conference, Durban, 29 August – 1 September 2018.

  • 2017: Making opera ‘from the South’: Neo Muyanga’s Heart of Redness. Paper presented at the South African Society for Research in Music Annual conference, Potchefstroom, 31 August – 2 September 2017.

  • 2017: Navigating the Constellation: Artistic Research, Self-reflexivity and Dissemination of Knowledge. Paper presented at the Society for Artistic Research Annual Conference, Helsinki, Finland, 28-29 April 2017.

  • 2017: Against the grain of invented tradition: South African Opera and Neo Muyanga’s Heart of Redness. Paper presented at the Orpheus Institute for Advanced Studies in Music Doctoral Conference, Ghent, Belgium, 22-23 February 2017.

  • 2016: Analysis, Meaning and Make-believe: Entry Points to Four Portraits and the life of Christopher Langford James. Paper presented at the South African Society for Research in Music Annual conference, Bloemfontein, 25-27 August 2016.

  • 2015: Yemoja in Moments: Analysis from a Performer Perspective. Lecture recital presented at the South African Society for Research in Music Annual conference, Cape Town, 16-18 July 2015.

  • 2015: Analysing from the inside out: Frederic Rzewski’s ‘De Profundis’ from a performer’s perspective. Lecture recital presented at the Performa Conference on Performance Studies, Aveiro, Portugal, 11-13 June 2015.

  • 2014: Making Voyeur Piano: on Composition and Site-Specific Performance. Lecture recital presented at the South African Society for Research in Music Annual conference, Johannesburg, South Africa, 12 – 14 September 2014.

  • 2014: The City as Phantasmagoria. Paper presented at the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research Conference ‘New Ethnographies of Johannesburg’, Johannesburg, South Africa, 12 – 13 August 2014.

  • 2014: Ethical by Default? The Regulation of Research Ethics as a Mechanism of Power. Paper presented at the UNISA ‘Contesting Freedoms: A Colloquium on Music Studies in a Democratic South Africa’, Pretoria, South Africa, 27-28 March 2014.

  • 2014: On Voyeurs and Walkers: A Performance Experiment. Paper presented at the Orpheus Institute for Artistic Research Conference ‘The Limits of Control’, Ghent, Belgium, 26 - 28 February 2014.

  • 2013: Performing the Argument: Site-Specific Performance and Practice-based Research. Paper presented at Performa International Conference on Performance Studies. Porto Alegre, Brazil, 31 May – 2 June 2013.

  • 2013: Performing the Argument: Site-Specific Performance and Practice-based Research. Paper presented at South African Society for Research in Music Annual Conference, East-London South Africa, 18 July – 20 July 2013.

  • 2013: Music, Politics and the Academy. Paper presented at a round table discussion at South African Society for Research in Music Annual Conference, East-London South Africa, 18 July – 20 July 2013.

  • 2013: Post-Everything Poster Boy: Spoek Mathambo’s “Control” as Urban Landscape. Paper presented at the Conference of the Hearing Landscape Critically: Music, Place and the Spaces of Sound Network, Stellenbosch, 9 September – 11 September 2013.

  • 2012: The Magic of the Mix: “De Profundis” for A Speaking Pianist by Frederic Rzewski. Lecture Recital and Paper presented South African Society for Research in Music Annual Conference, Pretoria, 19 July – 21 July.

  • 2012: Standards in Higher Education. Keynote Address: South African Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum, Bloemfontein, 3 October – 5 October 2012.

  • 2011: An Issue of Content: Mimesis and Simulacrum in Contemporary South African Concert Practice. Paper presented South African Society for Research in Music Annual Conference, Grahamstown, 23 June – 25 June 2011.

  • 2011: Performance and Research. Paper presented at a round table discussion, South African Society for Research in Music Annual Conference Grahamstown, 23 June – 25 June 2011.

Mareli Stolp

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Prof Micheal Blake

Honorary Professor of Experimental Composition

Arts and Social Sciences

Michael Blake was born in 1951 in Cape Town and left South Africa in 1977 to settle in London where he continued his studies and formed the alternative new music ensemble London New Music. Returning to South Africa in 1998, he established the ISCM South Africa, the New Music Indaba and Unyazi festivals and the Sterkfontein Composers Meeting. He has been visiting professor at universities and conservatoires in America, Europe and South Africa, and has given masterclasses as far afield as Bolivia and Japan.

Largely self-taught as a composer, his work is associated with conceptual art and the beginning of an experimental music movement in South Africa in the 1970s. His output extends from solo piano music and string quartets to orchestral music and opera. In 1976 he began a series of pieces based on African composition techniques, continuing in recent years to explore a postmodern aesthetic in a range of different styles. He was described in the Musical Times in 2011 as “perhaps the first South African composer to be unselfconsciously an African composer. His are the blueprints and stratagems of a new cosmopolitan South African sound”.

He has worked with the Fitzwilliam String Quartet, Ensemble Bash, Fidelio Trio, Stockholm Saxophone Quartet, Axelsson-Nilsson Duo, New Juilliard Ensemble, Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra, Mexico City Chamber Orchestra, and pianists such as John Tilbury, Michael Finnissy and Daan Vandewalle. In the past few years he has had commissions and performances at international festivals including Festival d’Automne à Paris, Ars Musica Belgium, World Music Days Slovenia, as well as in New York, Mexico City, Tokyo, Vienna, Milan, Cologne, Stockholm, Vilnius etc. His music has been recorded on a dozen CDs, and a Wergo CD of his complete cello music with Friedrich Gauwerky and Daan Vandewalle will be released in April 2018.

He has collaborated with fimmakers and artists, notably Willem Boshoff in the multimedia piece ‘Scoring Boschpoort’. His first artist book, ‘Five Pieces for Piccolo and Tuba’, is being released in a signed limited edition later this year.

He currently divides his time between his home, in France, and South Africa where he is Honorary Professor of Experimental Music at Africa Open Institute, University of Stellenbosch.

www.michaelblake.co.za https://soundcloud.com/ichaellake https://vimeo.com/album/3290650

Prof Micheal Blake

Honorary Professor of Experimental Composition

Arts and Social Sciences

  • All details on my website: www.michaelblaek.co.za Articles: http://www.michaelblake.co.za/articles-by-michael-blake Scores: http://www.michaelblake.co.za/works CDs: http://www.michaelblake.co.za/discography Recordings on the internet: https://soundcloud.com/ichaellake https://vimeo.com/album/3290650

Prof Micheal Blake

Honorary Professor of Experimental Composition

Arts and Social Sciences

  • Sterkfontein Composers Meeting

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  • Purpur Festival

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  • The Bow Project

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Jürgen May

Associate Professor Extraordinary

Arts and Social Sciences

Jürgen May, born in 1957, studied music in Bielefeld and musicology in Bonn. In 1989, he received his Ph.D. with a dissertation on early-seventeenth-century lute music. From 1984 to 1993 May worked on the edition of Beethoven’s letters at the Beethoven-Archiv Bonn. From 1999 to March 2018 he was Research Fellow at the Richard-Strauss-Institut Garmisch-Partenkirchen. He directed the Richard-Strauss-Quellenverzeichnis (Richard Strauss sources catalogue) and the edition of Strauss’s late writings, and is member of the advisory board of the Richard Strauss edition at the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften. Since 2017, May is Associate Professor Extraordinary at AOI.

Jürgen May has conducted research into 19th and early 20th century composers, particularly Ludwig van Beethoven and Richard Strauss. One of his focusses is the interrelationship between creative output, biography, and social and political contexts. His publications include studies on the creative process, music and politics in National Socialist Germany, and biographical mythmaking. As an editor of texts rather than of music, his methodological approach is based on critical studies of sources in which he has considerable expertise. At AOI, May is currently preparing the research database “Genadendal Music Collections Catalogue” (GMCC), which will serve as a pilot project for MUSA, a comprehensive online platform for documentation of, and research into, music of southern Africa.

Jürgen May

Associate Professor Extraordinary

Arts and Social Sciences

Jürgen May

Associate Professor Extraordinary

Arts and Social Sciences

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Clare Loveday

Arts and Social Sciences

Clare Loveday is a Johannesburg-based composer. Striving to convey through music the complications of life in a post-colonial society, her works have been described by critics in turn as ‘obstinate and fierce, big-boned and raw’, ‘subtle’ and ‘elusive’. She is best known for her classical saxophone compositions and interdisciplinary collaborations and has worked with a number of award-winning artists including the Gerhard Marx and Nandipha Mntambo. She has received numerous awards, grants and commissions from organisations such as the Mellon Foundation, SAMRO Foundation and performers such as Duo Montagnard, Ensemble Reconsil Vienna and Guy Yehuda. She has had works performed throughout South Africa and in Australia, Europe, England and the US, including at the ISCM World New Music Days, Juilliard New York, the Royal College of Music in London and Festival d’Automne à Paris. Clare lectured music theory and composition for many years at Wits University and was awarded a Doctorate of Music in 2009.

For more info see, http://clareloveday.co.za/

Upcoming events: see https://soundingcities.squarespace.com/

 

Clare Loveday

Arts and Social Sciences

Clare Loveday

Arts and Social Sciences

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Prof. Chris Walton

Affiliate

Arts

Chris Walton (*1963 in England) studied at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford and Zurich and held a postdoc Humboldt Fellowship at Munich University. He was head of Music Division at the Zentralbibliothek Zürich from 1990 to 2001. He also lectured at ETH Zurich and worked as an occasional freelance répétiteur and continuo player. He was appointed Professor and Head of Music Department at the University of Pretoria in 2001. Today he lectures in music history at the Musikhochschule Basel. He is an Honorary Member of the Allgemeine Musikgesellschaft Zürich and was awarded the Max Geilinger Prize in 2009 for his contribution to Swiss-British cultural ties.

Chris Walton is a music historian. He has published several books, many articles and reviews. His main research areas are Austro-German Romantic music from 1820 to 1950, Swiss music, and South African music. His books include biographies of the Swiss composers Othmar Schoeck (1886-1957) and Richard Flury (1896-1967), a study of Richard Wagner’s Zurich years, and a study of composers and their inspiration from Wagner to Alban Berg, Lies and Epiphanies, which has now been published in German translation.
Together with Stephanus Muller, Walton has edited two books on South African music: A Composer in Africa: Essays on the Life and Work of Stefans Grové and Gender and Sexuality in South African Music.
Walton has contributed articles to the New Grove, Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, the Cambridge Wagner Encylopedia and other reference works. He is currently running a research project on Richard Wagner and the Austro-German conducting tradition at the Bern University of the Arts.

Prof. Chris Walton

Affiliate

Arts

Prof. Chris Walton

Affiliate

Arts

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